Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > New plasma transistor could create sharper displays

Abstract:
By integrating a solid-state electron emitter and a microcavity plasma device, researchers at the University of Illinois have created a plasma transistor that could be used to make lighter, less expensive and higher resolution flat-panel displays.

"The new device is capable of controlling both the plasma conduction current and the light emission with an emitter voltage of 5 volts or less," said Gary Eden, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and director of the Laboratory for Optical Physics and Engineering at the U. of I.

New plasma transistor could create sharper displays

Champaign, IL | Posted on February 5th, 2009

At the heart of the plasma transistor is a microcavity plasma, an electronic-photonic device in which an electrically charged gas (a plasma) is contained within a microscopic cavity. Power is supplied by two electrodes at voltages of up to 200 volts.

Eden and graduate student Kuo-Feng (Kevin) Chen fabricated the plasma transistor from copper-clad laminate into which a microcavity 500 microns in diameter was produced by standard photolithographic techniques. The solid-state electron emitter was made from a silicon wafer, topped with a thin layer of silicon dioxide.

The microcavity is approximately the diameter of a human hair, and is filled with a small amount of gas. When excited by electrons, atoms in the plasma radiate light. The color of light depends on what gas is placed in the microcavity. Neon emits red light, for example, and argon emits blue light.

Around the plasma is a thin boundary layer called the sheath. Within the sheath, electrical current is carried not by negatively charged electrons, but instead by positively charged ions. Much heavier than electrons and therefore harder to accelerate, the ions require a large electric field generated by a large voltage drop across the sheath.

The intense electric field within the plasma sheath also promotes electron transport, said Eden, who also is a researcher at the university's Coordinated Science Laboratory and at the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory. "By injecting electrons from the emitter into the sheath, we can significantly increase the flow of electrons through the plasma, which increases the plasma's conductivity and light emission."

While the microcavity plasma still requires up to 200 volts to emit light and conduct current, the current and light emission can be controlled by an electron emitter operating at 5 volts or less, Eden said. The current that is sent through the sheath to the bulk plasma determines how much current is carried by the two electrodes driving the microplasma.

In previous work, Eden's team created flat-panel plasma lamps out of two sheets of aluminum foil separated by a thin dielectric layer of clear aluminum oxide. More than 250,000 lamps can be packed into a single panel. And, because microcavity plasmas operate at atmospheric pressure, thick pieces of glass are not needed to seal them. The lightweight plasma panels are less than 1 millimeter thick.

"Being able to control each microcavity plasma independently could turn our plasma panel into a less expensive and higher resolution plasma display," Eden said. "The plasma transistor also could be used in applications where you want to use a small voltage to control a great deal of power."

Eden and Chen described the plasma transistor in the journal Applied Physics Letters. The researchers have applied for a patent.

The work was supported by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor

217-244-1073

Copyright © University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Yale researchersí technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

FEI Launches Helios G4 DualBeam Series for Materials Science: The Helios G4 DualBeam Series features new capabilities to enable scientists and engineers to answer the most demanding and challenging scientific questions June 27th, 2016

Russian physicists create a high-precision 'quantum ruler': Physicists have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state June 25th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Display technology/LEDs/SS Lighting/OLEDs

GraphExeter illuminates bright new future for flexible lighting devices June 23rd, 2016

New nanomaterial offers promise in bendable, wearable electronic devices: Electroplated polymer makes transparent, highly conductive, ultrathin film June 13th, 2016

Graphene-based transparent electrodes for highly efficient flexible OLEDS: A Korean research team developed an ideal electrode structure composed of graphene and layers of titanium dioxide and conducting polymers, resulting in highly flexible and efficient OLEDs June 5th, 2016

Nanotubes are beacons in cancer-imaging technique: Rice University researchers use spectral triangulation to pinpoint location of tumors May 21st, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Ultrathin, flat lens resolves chirality and color: Multifunctional lens could replace bulky, expensive machines June 25th, 2016

Particle zoo in a quantum computer: First experimental quantum simulation of particle physics phenomena June 23rd, 2016

Titan shines light on high-temperature superconductor pathway: Simulation demonstrates how superconductivity arises in cuprates' pseudogap phase June 22nd, 2016

Discoveries

Yale researchersí technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

Superheroes are real: Ultrasensitive nonlinear metamaterials for data transfer June 25th, 2016

Russian physicists create a high-precision 'quantum ruler': Physicists have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state June 25th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Announcements

Yale researchersí technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

FEI Launches Helios G4 DualBeam Series for Materials Science: The Helios G4 DualBeam Series features new capabilities to enable scientists and engineers to answer the most demanding and challenging scientific questions June 27th, 2016

Russian physicists create a high-precision 'quantum ruler': Physicists have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state June 25th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

New 'ukidama' nanoparticle structure revealed June 14th, 2016

Rice wins award to recruit cancer researcher: $2 million CPRIT grant aims to bring MIT researcher Omid Veiseh to Houston June 7th, 2016

Nanobiotix receives US$1m milestone payment from PharmaEngine: First patient injected with NBTXR3 in soft tissue sarcoma registration phase in Asia May 31st, 2016

Programmable materials find strength in molecular repetition May 23rd, 2016

Military

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Ultrathin, flat lens resolves chirality and color: Multifunctional lens could replace bulky, expensive machines June 25th, 2016

Scientists engineer tunable DNA for electronics applications June 21st, 2016

Marrying superconductors, lasers, and Bose-Einstein condensates: Chapman University Institute for Quantum Studies (IQS) member Yutaka Shikano, Ph.D., recently had research published in Scientific Reports June 20th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic