Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Putting a new spin on current research

Abstract:
Physicists in the USA and at the London Centre for Nanotechnology have found a way to extend the quantum lifetime of electrons by more than 5,000 per cent, as reported in this week's Physical Review Letters. Electrons exhibit a property called ‘spin' and work like tiny magnets which can point up, down or a quantum superposition of both. The state of the spin can be used to store information and so by extending their life the research provides a significant step towards building a usable quantum computer.

Putting a new spin on current research

Europe | Posted on November 14th, 2008

"Silicon has dominated the computing industry for decades," says Dr Gavin Morley, lead author of the paper. "The most sensitive way to see the quantum behaviour of electrons held in silicon chips uses electrical currents. Unfortunately, the problem has always been that these currents damage the quantum features under study, degrading their usefulness."

Marshall Stoneham, Professor of Physics at UCL (University College London), commented: "Getting the answer from a quantum computation isn't easy. This new work takes us closer to solving the problem by showing how we might read out the state of electron spins in a silicon-based quantum computer."

To achieve the record quantum lifetime the team used a magnetic field twenty-five times stronger than those used in previous experiments. This powerful field also provided an additional advantage in the quest for practical quantum computing: it put the electron spins into a convenient starting state by aligning them all in one direction.

For more information, see the paper published in Physical Review Letters, November 14 2008, by G. W. Morley (London Center for Nanotechnology), D. R. McCamey (University of Utah), H. A. Seipel (University of Utah), L.-C. Brunel (National High Magnetic field Laboratory), J. van Tol (National High Magnetic field Laboratory) and C. Boehme (University of Utah).

####

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Keysight Technologies Shifts to Direct Sales of High-Performance Products in North America March 3rd, 2015

Cambrios and Heraeus Jointly Create New, High-Conductivity Transparent Conductors: Two Companies' Combined Products Dramatically Extend Flexible Substrate Capabilities for Next-Generation Mass-Market Technology Products March 3rd, 2015

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Democratizing synthetic biology: New method makes research cheaper, faster, and more accessible March 3rd, 2015

Spintronics

Insight into inner magnetic layers: Measurements at BESSY II have shown how spin filters forming within magnetic sandwiches influence tunnel magnetoresistance -- results that can help in designing spintronic component- February 17th, 2015

A new spin on spintronics: Michigan team tests radiation-resistant spintronic material, possibly enabling electronic devices that will work in harsh environments February 17th, 2015

Nanoscale Mirrored Cavities Amplify, Connect Quantum Memories: Advance could lead to quantum computing and the secure transfer of information over long-distance fiber optic networks January 28th, 2015

Piezoelectricity in a 2-D semiconductor: Berkeley Lab researchers discovery of piezoelectricty in molybdenum disulfide holds promise for future MEMS December 22nd, 2014

Quantum Computing

Forbidden quantum leaps possible with high-res spectroscopy March 2nd, 2015

Important step towards quantum computing: Metals at atomic scale March 2nd, 2015

Waterloo invention advances quantum computing research: New device, which will be used in labs around the world to develop quantum technologies, produces fragile entangled photons in a more efficient way February 16th, 2015

Quantum research past, present and future for discussion at AAAS February 16th, 2015

Discoveries

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Democratizing synthetic biology: New method makes research cheaper, faster, and more accessible March 3rd, 2015

Pens filled with high-tech inks for do-it-yourself sensors March 3rd, 2015

Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication March 3rd, 2015

Announcements

The taming of magnetic vortices: Unified theory for skyrmion-materials March 3rd, 2015

Democratizing synthetic biology: New method makes research cheaper, faster, and more accessible March 3rd, 2015

Pens filled with high-tech inks for do-it-yourself sensors March 3rd, 2015

Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication March 3rd, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE