Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Liquid crystals line up to make self-healing photovoltaic device

Figure 1: Schematic of the liquid crystal molecule (top) and the formed liquid crystal photovoltaic device (bottom). Purple spheres represent the fullerene and yellow/green chains the oligothiophene, the hydrophobic/hydrophilic tails are represented by blue/red lines respectively. Image:Riken
Figure 1: Schematic of the liquid crystal molecule (top) and the formed liquid crystal photovoltaic device (bottom). Purple spheres represent the fullerene and yellow/green chains the oligothiophene, the hydrophobic/hydrophilic tails are represented by blue/red lines respectively. Image:Riken

Abstract:
Molecules containing both electron donors and acceptors have been functionalized with tails that control their arrangement in a liquid-crystal photovoltaic device

Liquid crystals line up to make self-healing photovoltaic device

Japan | Posted on October 31st, 2008

A huge market is developing for small disposable electronic devices, ranging from security tags to point-of-care diagnostics. Many of these devices require a power source, and photovoltaic devices (solar cells) are an attractive option. However, the expense of preparing and processing inorganic semiconductors used in traditional solar cells precludes their use in such applications. Organic photovoltaic devices, meanwhile have great potential in this area; they are relatively easy to prepare and can be processed by simple techniques such as inkjet printing.

Organic photovoltaic devices contain both electron donors, which release an electron when irradiated, and electron acceptors, which complete the circuit necessary to convert light energy into electrical energy. However, mixtures of typical electron donors such as π-conjugated oligomers—short chains of repeated, unsaturated, organic molecules, with alternating double and single bonds—and electron acceptors, such as C60 (buckminsterfullerene), have a tendency to form alternating stacks that results in lower efficiency. A partial solution is to directly attach the electron donor to the electron acceptor by a covalent bond and have both in a single molecule, but it is still important to have control over how the molecules pack together.

Now, a team of Japanese researchers including Takuzo Aida from the University of Tokyo and Masaki Takata from the RIKEN SPring-8 Center in Harima have designed liquid crystals—a phase that flows like a liquid but has short-range order between the molecules—that spontaneously assemble to form a donor-acceptor array1. "It's important to form separated columns or layers of the donors and acceptors, and to make a large contact area between them," explains Yohei Yamamoto, another member of the team from the Japan Science and Technology Agency in Tokyo.

The molecules they designed feature a fullerene—the electron acceptor—at one end and a thiophene oligomer—the electron donor—at the other. A hydrophobic, or water-repellent, tail is attached to the donor end and a hydrophilic, or water-loving, tail is attached to the acceptor end. This functionalization ensures that the molecules of the liquid crystal line up (Fig. 1) to produce ordered layers of donors and acceptors and results in efficient photovoltaic behavior. "The liquid characteristics are useful as well," notes Yamamoto, "the devices are self-healing as defects in the layer structure can be repaired by a simple heating and cooling process." The design principles developed in this work should lead to the development of high-efficiency organic photovoltaic devices.
Reference

1. Li, W.-S., Yamamoto, Y., Fukushima, T., Saeki, A., Seki, S., Tagawa, S., Masunaga, H., Sasaki, S., Takata, M. & Aida, T. Amphiphilic molecular design as a rational strategy for tailoring bicontinuous electron donor and acceptor arrays: photoconductive liquid crystalline oligothiophene-C60 dyads. Journal of the American Chemical Society 130, 8886-8887 (2008).

The corresponding author for this highlight is based at the RIKEN Structural Materials Science Laboratory

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Riken

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

article

Related News Press

News and information

Protein Building Blocks for Nanosystems: Scientists develop method for producing bio-based materials with new properties April 17th, 2015

Oxford Instruments commissions high field outsert magnet system for the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 32 Tesla magnet program April 17th, 2015

QD Vision Expands Product Line with Two-Millimeter Color LCD Display Optic: Color IQ™ Optic Enables Full-Color Gamut for Ultra-Thin Displays and All-in-One Computers April 16th, 2015

The National Science Foundation names engineering researcher Andrea Alú its Alan T. Waterman awardee for 2015: Alú is a pioneer in the field of metamaterials who has developed "cloaking" technology to make objects invisible to sensors April 16th, 2015

Discoveries

Protein Building Blocks for Nanosystems: Scientists develop method for producing bio-based materials with new properties April 17th, 2015

Major advance in artificial photosynthesis poses win/win for the environment: Berkeley Lab researchers perform solar-powered green chemistry with captured CO2 April 16th, 2015

Newly-Developed Nanocatalysts Increase Performance of Fuel Cells April 16th, 2015

Lanthanide-Organic Framework Nanothermometers Prepared by Spray-Drying April 16th, 2015

Announcements

Protein Building Blocks for Nanosystems: Scientists develop method for producing bio-based materials with new properties April 17th, 2015

Oxford Instruments commissions high field outsert magnet system for the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 32 Tesla magnet program April 17th, 2015

Newly-Developed Nanocatalysts Increase Performance of Fuel Cells April 16th, 2015

Lanthanide-Organic Framework Nanothermometers Prepared by Spray-Drying April 16th, 2015

Energy

Major advance in artificial photosynthesis poses win/win for the environment: Berkeley Lab researchers perform solar-powered green chemistry with captured CO2 April 16th, 2015

Newly-Developed Nanocatalysts Increase Performance of Fuel Cells April 16th, 2015

Graphenea embarks on a new era April 16th, 2015

Cobalt film a clean-fuel find: Rice University discovery is efficient, robust at drawing hydrogen and oxygen from water April 15th, 2015

Solar/Photovoltaic

The microscopic topography of ink on paper: Researchers have analyzed the varying thickness of printed toner in unprecedented 3-D detail, yielding insights that could lead to higher quality, less expensive and more environmentally-friendly glossy and non-glossy papers April 14th, 2015

Graphene pushes the speed limit of light-to-electricity conversion: Researchers from ICFO, MIT and UC Riverside have been able to develop a graphene-based photodetector capable of converting absorbed light into an electrical voltage at ultrafast timescales April 14th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use Ultrasound Waves to Produce Fullerene April 9th, 2015

Wrapping carbon nanotubes in polymers enhances their performance: Scientists at Japan's Kyushu University say polymer-wrapped carbon nanotubes hold much promise in biotechnology and energy applications March 30th, 2015

Printing/Lithography/Inkjet/Inks

The microscopic topography of ink on paper: Researchers have analyzed the varying thickness of printed toner in unprecedented 3-D detail, yielding insights that could lead to higher quality, less expensive and more environmentally-friendly glossy and non-glossy papers April 14th, 2015

Inkjet-printed liquid metal could bring wearable tech, soft robotics April 8th, 2015

Perpetuus Advanced Materials secures landmark commercial agreement with global technology group Heraeus: Perpetuus will supply innovative alternatives to existing silver and copper-based inks and pastes April 2nd, 2015

Haydale Announce Dedicated Graphene Inks Manufacturing Capability March 25th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE