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Home > Press > Det-Tronics Introduces Ultra-Fast H2S Gas Detector

The NTMOS hydrogen sulfide gas sensor from Detector Electronics Corporation detects low concentrations of H2S in five seconds or less.
The NTMOS hydrogen sulfide gas sensor from Detector Electronics Corporation detects low concentrations of H2S in five seconds or less.

Abstract:
NTMOS Sensor Uses Nanotechnology in a Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) Sensor to Save Lives

Det-Tronics Introduces Ultra-Fast H2S Gas Detector

Minneapolis, MN | Posted on October 22nd, 2008

Detector Electronics Corporation (Det-Tronics) today announced an NTMOS hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensor that detects low H2S gas concentrations in five seconds or less while tolerating harsh environments that experience extreme temperature and/or humidity conditions (ntmos.det-tronics.com). Det-Tronics is part of UTC Fire & Security, a unit of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

Third-party tested to ISA-92.0.01, the NTMOS H2S gas sensor detects hydrogen sulfide in conditions that harm electrochemical and standard MOS sensors. The sensor is packaged in a rugged housing, protected by a sintered stainless steel flame arrestor, and can be installed in Class I, Division 1 locations. The NTMOS gas sensor can be installed as a stand-alone sensor or combined with a display for local indication.

"We look forward to partnering with customers to reduce the occurrences of hydrogen-sulfide injuries and deaths," said Cliff Anderson, Marketing Director at Det-Tronics. "Our new detector alerts people to the presence of hydrogen sulfide in less than half the time of other detectors. And the onboard humidity and temperature sensors ensure accurate and repeatable readings."

####

About Detector Electronics Corporation
Detector Electronics Corporation (Det-Tronics) is a world leader in industrial fire detection, gas detection, and hazard mitigation systems. Det-Tronics designs, builds, tests, and commissions safety systems that range from conventional panels to fault-tolerant, addressable systems. Det-Tronics flame and gas detectors are globally certified to the latest product approvals standards, including critical SIL-2 industrial applications.

Det-Tronics is part of UTC Fire & Security, which provides fire safety and security solutions to more than one million customers around the world. Headquartered in Connecticut, UTC Fire & Security is a business unit of United Technologies Corp., which provides high technology products and services to the building and aerospace industries worldwide. More information can be found at www.utcfireandsecurity.com.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Det-Tronics
Cathryn Kasic
+1-952-833-8661

Copyright © Business Wire 2008

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