Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Prof Lauded for Groundbreaking Semiconductor Work: American Physical Society Award Recognizes Advances in Infrared Spectroscopy

Dr. Yves Chabal (left) is head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at UT Dallas.
Dr. Yves Chabal (left) is head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at UT Dallas.

Abstract:
The American Physical Society has awarded a UT Dallas researcher one of the society's highest honors, recognizing Dr. Yves Chabal's development of methods to better understand processes that take place on the silicon surface that is literally the platform for the multibillion-dollar semiconductor industry.

Prof Lauded for Groundbreaking Semiconductor Work: American Physical Society Award Recognizes Advances in Infrared Spectroscopy

Dallas, TX | Posted on October 19th, 2008

"Yves's development of infrared spectroscopy in the 1980s to understand the processes that occur on silicon surfaces during semiconductor manufacturing changed how everyone in the semiconductor industry does their work," said Bruce Gnade, vice president for research at UT Dallas. "His work has had tremendous impact. In the world of infrared spectroscopy of semiconductor surfaces,Yves is the world's expert."

Dr. Chabal is head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at UT Dallas and the first holder of the school's Texas Instruments Distinguished University Chair in Nanoelectronics.

The Davisson-Germer Prize is a biennial award given to recognize and encourage outstanding work in atomic or surface physics. Dr. Chabal was chosen as the 2009 recipient of the prize "for the individual development and collaborative application of fundamental surface infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical methods to silicon surface reactions important in microelectronics," according to the society's official announcement.

Dr. Chabal and his co-recipient of the award, Krishnan Raghavachari of Indiana University, were colleagues at Bell Labs, where Dr. Chabal spent 22 years prior to joining Rutgers University in 2003. The State of Texas Emerging Technology Fund's Nanoelectronics Research Superiority Initiative was instrumental in bringing Dr. Chabal to UT Dallas from Rutgers earlier this year.

"Yves Chabal is a perfect example of the kind of outstanding researchers whom we are committed to attracting to UT Dallas as we advance toward becoming one of the nation's top research universities," said UT Dallas Provost Dr. Hobson Wildenthal. "This well-deserved honor is a tribute to Dr. Chabal's past work, but I think it is also a harbinger of the great things we will see emerge from his lab in the future."

####

About UT Dallas
With more than 2,600 students, nearly 100 faculty and over $27 million in research funding, the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at UT Dallas is in the midst of a $300 million public-private initiative that includes the recent completion of a 192,000-square-foot interdisciplinary research building. Named after Texas Instruments co-founder J. Erik Jonsson, the school awards degrees in electrical engineering, computer science, telecommunications engineering, computer engineering, software engineering, and materials science and engineering.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
David Moore
UT Dallas
(972) 883-4183

or
Office of Media Relations
UT Dallas
(972) 883-2155

Copyright © UT Dallas

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Graphene is strong, but is it tough? Berkeley Lab scientists find that polycrystalline graphene is not very resistant to fracture February 7th, 2016

Lithium battery catalyst found to harm key soil microorganism February 7th, 2016

Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories: Berkeley Lab researchers part of team that creates new function in tiny protein shell structures February 6th, 2016

Discovery of the specific properties of graphite-based carbon materials February 6th, 2016

Academic/Education

COD Grad Begins Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University: Marsela Jorgolli's Passion for Physics Has Led to a Decade of Academic Research That Continues at Harvard University as a Postdoctoral Fellow February 2nd, 2016

Heriot-Watt's Institute of Photonics & Quantum Sciences uses the Deben Microtest 2 kN tensile stage to characterise ceramics and engineering plastics January 21st, 2016

Multiple uses for the JPK NanoWizard AFM system in the Smart Interfaces in Environmental Nanotechnology Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign January 20th, 2016

BioSolar Extends Research Agreement With UCSB for Next Phase of Its Super Battery Technology: Development Effort to Continue Under the Supervision of Nobel Laureate, Dr. Alan Heeger January 13th, 2016

Chip Technology

Organic crystals allow creating flexible electronic devices: The researchers from the Faculty of Physics of the Moscow State University have grown organic crystals that allow creating flexible electronic devices February 5th, 2016

Scientists guide gold nanoparticles to form 'diamond' superlattices: DNA scaffolds cage and coax nanoparticles into position to form crystalline arrangements that mimic the atomic structure of diamond February 4th, 2016

Polar vortices observed in ferroelectric: New state of matter holds promise for ultracompact data storage and processing February 4th, 2016

Electrons and liquid helium advance understanding of zero-resistance: Study of electrons on liquid helium systems sheds light on zero-resistance phenomenon in semiconductors February 2nd, 2016

Announcements

Graphene is strong, but is it tough? Berkeley Lab scientists find that polycrystalline graphene is not very resistant to fracture February 7th, 2016

Lithium battery catalyst found to harm key soil microorganism February 7th, 2016

Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories: Berkeley Lab researchers part of team that creates new function in tiny protein shell structures February 6th, 2016

Discovery of the specific properties of graphite-based carbon materials February 6th, 2016

Tools

Researchers discover new phase of boron nitride and a new way to create pure c-BN February 5th, 2016

Cornell researchers create first self-assembled superconductor February 1st, 2016

New record in nanoelectronics at ultralow temperatures January 28th, 2016

LC.300 Series Nanopositioning Controller from nPoint January 28th, 2016

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Graphene is strong, but is it tough? Berkeley Lab scientists find that polycrystalline graphene is not very resistant to fracture February 7th, 2016

Hepatitis virus-like particles as potential cancer treatment February 5th, 2016

COD Grad Begins Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University: Marsela Jorgolli's Passion for Physics Has Led to a Decade of Academic Research That Continues at Harvard University as a Postdoctoral Fellow February 2nd, 2016

Identifying Commercial Success Stories from the National Nanotechnology Initiative: National Nanotechnology Coordination Office and White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Issue a Request for Information on NNI-Supported Success Stories February 2nd, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic