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Home > Press > Architect Suffers Job Loss - Invents Successful Toy

Abstract:
Architect Mark Allan recently suffered the loss of his job due to the economic downturn in the housing construction market. Sending out hundreds of resumes did not help his situation, so along with his job search he also spent the last of his savings to develop a construction toy for children. His wife and kids encouraged him to use his advanced 3D computer training and architectural software to develop the prototype models and metal molds. From that point forward, it was just a short step to full plastic production. The economy might be bad, but toys are just as popular as ever.

Architect Suffers Job Loss - Invents Successful Toy

BEND, O | Posted on October 16th, 2008

Now he enjoys a brisk business, selling the toy online with big box stores. This geometric Construction Toy of the Future -- Qubits(R), is a dynamic new entry into the multi-million dollar construction-toy industry. It is gaining popularity with school teachers, retailers and -- of course -- children all across the USA. A simple plastic toy that can be built up using a unique patented modular geometry, it quickly captures the imagination of children who might have visions of becoming architects, engineers, scientists or even nanotech designers.

As a father and an architect, the inventor, Mr. Allan, realizes that math and science can be intimidating mentally, "But if you can put something in the hands of a child, they will be able to comprehend things better and have more fun," he says. "Toys influence children; hopefully Qubits(R) will inspire today's children to expand their horizons to include engineering, chemistry or nanotechnology."

Qubits(R), pronounced Q - bits, stands for quantum bits, Mr. Allan said, which are a unit of measurement in the realm of science that includes the development of semiconductors used to make the technology of cell phones or computers. Just as coal can become diamonds when its atoms are rearranged, Mr. Allan says Qubits(R) help children understand the possibilities in rearranging nature's building blocks. "I always want to associate Qubits(R) with science," Mark said. "That's what makes our toy different from everybody else's."

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