Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Applied science researcher wins thin-film award

VMEC Associate Professor Ale Lukaszew (left) works with César Clavero, a post-doctoral research associate in applied science, in their lab in McGlothlin-Street Hall. Clavero says that the aluminum foil covering parts of their vacuum pump makes an excellent insulator. He recently won an Outstanding Young Researcher Award from the American Vacuum Society.
VMEC Associate Professor Ale Lukaszew (left) works with César Clavero, a post-doctoral research associate in applied science, in their lab in McGlothlin-Street Hall. Clavero says that the aluminum foil covering parts of their vacuum pump makes an excellent insulator. He recently won an Outstanding Young Researcher Award from the American Vacuum Society.

Abstract:
César Clavero, a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Applied Science, has been named the recipient of the 2008 Outstanding Young Researcher Award from the American Vacuum Society.

Clavero's award comes from the Thin Film Division of the society, in recognition of his work on magneto-plasmonic materials with Ale Lukaszew, VMEC Associate Professor in Physics and Applied Science. The award will be presented at the AVS international meeting to be held Oct. 19-24 in Boston.

Applied science researcher wins thin-film award

Williamsburg, VA | Posted on October 6th, 2008

Clavero and Lukaszew combine gold and cobalt in ultra-thin films in an effort to obtain materials with optimal optical and magnetic qualities for potential use in biosensors or other nanotech applications.

"An important aspect of this is that the materials are in thin film form," Lukaszew said. "It requires specific training. You need to be trained in ultra-high vacuum technology, thin film growth and characterization. So, it's not just a question of mixing materials; it's a question of mixing them right so that they have the optimum optical and structural properties."

The films they're working with are in the 20-nanometer range. "A nanometer is one billionth of a meter," Clavero explained. "One nanometer is like three atoms on top of each other. So we're talking about something that's just a few atoms thick."

Their work has several components. Much of it is done on the third floor of McGlothlin-Street Hall in an ultra high vacuum chamber, but they also have an instrument at the Applied Research Center in Newport News, custom-built by Clavero and two other graduate students in Lukaszew's group, J. Skuza and K. Yang. It's a laser-driven device that allows the researchers to record very, very precise angular measurements of the optical characteristics of their samples.

Clavero and Lukaszew not only grow the cobalt-gold films, but also characterize them—evaluate their optical, structural, magnetic and morphological properties. In addition to the lab work, Clavero constructs mathematical models of these films, striving to produce a material with the optimum characteristics.

"Much of the thought going on in nanotechnology is related to the search for new properties that arise from confining materials into very small dimensions," Lukaszew explained. "With this particular material, we're concerned with plasmons—energy oscillations that occur when light strikes it and how this affects its magneto-optical properties. The effect you are looking for occurs at a very, very specific thickness of material."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
The College of William and Mary
Department/Office
P.O. Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
University Relations
757-221-2630

Copyright © The College of William & Mary

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Thin films

MIPT scientists revisit optical constants of ultrathin gold films October 20th, 2017

Rice University chemists make laser-induced graphene from wood July 31st, 2017

Graduate Students from Across the Country Attend Hands-on NanoCamp: Prominent scientists Warren Oliver, Ph.D., and George Pharr, Ph.D., presented a weeklong NanoCamp for hand-picked graduate students across the United States July 26th, 2017

Studying Argon Gas Trapped in Two-Dimensional Array of Tiny "Cages": Understanding how individual atoms enter and exit the nanoporous frameworks could help scientists design new materials for gas separation and nuclear waste remediation July 17th, 2017

Announcements

UCLA chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heat: Tiny structures could be next-generation solution for smaller electronic devices December 8th, 2017

Untangling DNA: Researchers filter the entropy out of nanopore measurements December 8th, 2017

Device makes power conversion more efficient: New design could dramatically cut energy waste in electric vehicles, data centers, and the power grid December 8th, 2017

JPK Instruments announce partnership with Swiss company, Cytosurge AG. The partnership makes Cytosurge’s FluidFM® technology available on the JPK NanoWizard® AFM platform December 8th, 2017

Events/Classes

Arrowhead Presents New Clinical Data Demonstrating a Sustained Host Response in Hepatitis B Patients Following RNAi Therapy — Up to 5.0 log10 reduction in HBsAg observed; data presented at HEP DART 2017 — December 6th, 2017

Leti Breakthroughs Point Way to Significant Improvements in SoC Memories December 6th, 2017

NanoSummit in Luxembourg: single wall carbon nanotubes have entered our lives as we approach a nanoaugmented future November 23rd, 2017

Precision NanoSystems to host nanomedicines roundtable November 23rd, 2017

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Wheat gets boost from purified nanotubes: Rice University toxicity study shows plant growth enhanced by -- but only by -- purified nanotubes December 6th, 2017

Researchers advance technique to detect ovarian cancer: Rice, MD Anderson use fluorescent carbon nanotube probes to achieve first in vivo success November 30th, 2017

Fast flowing heat in graphene heterostructures: Surprisingly fast heat flow from graphene to its surrounding November 29th, 2017

Tiny robots step closer to treating hard-to-reach parts of the body November 25th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project