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Home > News > California Scientists Design Working Tricorder

September 28th, 2008

California Scientists Design Working Tricorder

Abstract:
Since we learned yesterday that everyone's cell phone will be a nuclear weapon detector in the future, it comes as no surprise today that scientists at the University of California have created what is, in effect, a Tricorder. They're calling it a much more modest name (Universal Detector), but the facts of the matter are clear: You'll be able to point this thing at other things and figure out what they're made of.

As if there was any doubt, the device would use nanotechnology to decipher what kinds of contaminants are present on any surface it scans.

The idea uses a thin layer of metal drilled with nanoscale holes, laid onto the surface being tested. When the perforated plate is zapped with laser light, the surface plasmons that form emit light with a frequency related to the materials touching the plate. A sensitive light detector is needed to measure the frequency of light given off.

Source:
gizmodo.com

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