Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > More Powerful Sources and Innovations Pushing EUVL Closer to Volume Manufacturing, Lithographers Conclude at International Workshop in Maui

Abstract:
Increasingly powerful plasma source based scanners that could be enhanced with optical innovations and improved resists are driving extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) closer to manufacturability, according to technologists at a recently concluded EUVL R&D forum here.

More Powerful Sources and Innovations Pushing EUVL Closer to Volume Manufacturing, Lithographers Conclude at International Workshop in Maui

MAUI, HI | Posted on June 17th, 2008

The 2008 International Workshop on EUV Lithography, held June 10-12 at the Wailea Beach Marriott, brought together lithographers from North America, Europe and Asia for a multi-disciplinary look at new solutions for the technical challenges to bringing EUVL into high-volume semiconductor manufacturing.

The gathering was organized by EUV Litho, Inc., an organization dedicated to promoting and accelerating EUVL through workshops and education. Industry organization SPIE co-sponsored the Workshop and will publish its proceedings along with an audio recording of the workshop.

"Many of the presentations came from universities and national labs, which have been major sources of innovation for EUVL," said Vivek Bakshi, President of EUV Litho, Inc. "Speakers focused less on commercial products and more on R&D, with an emphasis on how to make current technology work."

Sergey Zakharov of NANO-UV described potential of raising xenon to the higher ionization stages of 17 to 25 to provide a 2 percent conversion efficiency (CE), which means that 2 W of EUV light are generated for every 100 W of energy input. If verified, the higher conversion rate makes Xe more competitive with tin (Sn) as the fuel for EUV light sources.

Sharp increases were reported in the power of LPP-based sources, with Gigaphoton's 13 kilowatt (kW) CO2 laser-based system the most powerful to date. Presenter Akira Endo said Gigaphoton couples this laser intensity with the 4% CE of Sn to produce significantly greater source power. Some researchers believe that integrated LPP sources can collect up to four times more power than its technology rival, discharge-produced plasma (DPP).

However, Juergen Kleinschmidt, representing XTREME technologies and Philips Extreme, argued that LPP may not realize that level of increased collection efficiency. Kleinschmidt noted that only DPP sources have been successfully integrated and revealed results of lab experiments showing that DPP sources can continue to provide more power in coming years via increased operational frequency. Others said that much of today's DPP source power is still not utilized by scanners, making integration the main challenge today for increasing the throughput of the scanners.

Advances in optics and optical techniques to advance the capabilities of EUVL also were offered by presenters:

-- Torsten Feigl of Fraunhofer described his lab's success in developing
collector optics technology that can support the requirements of LPP-based
sources.

-- Patrick Naulleau of LBL showed designs based on diffractive optical
elements to extract twice the EUV light from sources and deliver it to the
wafer.

-- Russ Hudyma of Hyperion presented a high numerical aperture (NA)
obscured optics design that reportedly can take EUVL to the 9 nm node,
considered by many to be the endpoint of the International Technology
Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). He also presented new optics designs
that can help scanners use much more of available source power, decreasing
heat generation and the resultant need for cooling. Such designs appear to
be part of the solution to increasing scanner throughput.


Chemical resist suppliers demonstrated a strong commitment to developing improved EUV resists. New approaches include molecular resists and new polymer designs to address the challenges of resist sensitivity, line edge roughness (LER) and resolution. With the recently announced recalibration of resist sensitivities by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) and the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST), 10 millijoule (mJ) EUV resists now appear feasible.

However, LER will continue to be problematic for all lithography techniques as manufacturers print smaller and smaller features. Understanding the nature of LER requires the assessment of four parameters and not just one, according to well-known lithography expert Chris Mack, who taught a day-long class on LER fundamentals. Mack also outlined the experimental rigor needed to allow researchers to compare their results and permit new theories of LER to be verified.

In other discussions and events at the Workshop:

-- Professor Padraig Dunne of University College Dublin called on
governments, universities and industry to conduct a second round of
collaboration aimed at creating a detailed roadmap for EUVL R&D. (Panelists
from the Workshop plan to draft such a roadmap in coming months.)

-- The second International Workshop on EUV Lithography is planned for
summer 2009 in Hawaii, with specific dates and location will be announced
later. More information on this year's Workshop is available at
www.euvlitho.com.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Vivek Bakshi

512-462-2290 (office)
512-784-7585 (cell)

Copyright © Marketwire

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance May 30th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

Two UCSB Professors Receive Early Career Research Awards: The Department of Energy’s award for young scientists acknowledges UC Santa Barbara’s standing as a top tier research institution May 29th, 2015

Chip Technology

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

New chip makes testing for antibiotic-resistant bacteria faster, easier: Researchers at the University of Toronto design diagnostic chip to reduce testing time from days to one hour, allowing doctors to pick the right antibiotic the first time May 28th, 2015

Collaboration could lead to biodegradable computer chips May 28th, 2015

Physicists solve quantum tunneling mystery: ANU media release: An international team of scientists studying ultrafast physics have solved a mystery of quantum mechanics, and found that quantum tunneling is an instantaneous process May 27th, 2015

Announcements

New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance May 30th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

Two UCSB Professors Receive Early Career Research Awards: The Department of Energy’s award for young scientists acknowledges UC Santa Barbara’s standing as a top tier research institution May 29th, 2015

Events/Classes

SouthWest NanoTechnologies Introduces AgeNT™ Transparent Conductor System at SID Display Week, Booth #543 May 28th, 2015

Technology for Tomorrow’s Market Opportunities and Challenges: LetiDays Grenoble Presents the Possibilities: June 24-25 Event Includes Focus on IoT-Augmented Mobility and Leti’s Latest Results on Silicon Technologies, Sensors, Health Applications and Smart Cities May 27th, 2015

Arrowhead to Present at Jefferies 2015 Healthcare Conference May 27th, 2015

Haydale Named Lead Sponsor for Cambridge Graphene Festival May 22nd, 2015

Printing/Lithography/Inkjet/Inks

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Printing 3-D graphene structures for tissue engineering: A new ink formulation allows for the 3-D printing of graphene structures May 19th, 2015

ORNL demonstrates first large-scale graphene fabrication May 14th, 2015

New JEOL E-Beam Lithography System to Enhance Quantum NanoFab Capabilities May 6th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project