Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition Calls for Nanotechnology Regulation

Abstract:
Advocacy Group Releases New Report about Environmental Impact of New Technology

Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition Calls for Nanotechnology Regulation

San Jose, CA | Posted on April 2nd, 2008

The Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) released a 30-page report today that addresses the potential dangers of the rapidly expanding nanotechnology industry. In an industrial gold rush that mirrors the semiconductor and biotech booms, Silicon Valley is rapidly emerging as the center for a host of new nanotechnologies. The report traces the clear and alarming parallels between today's nanotechnology industry and the semiconductor industry of the 1980s, when disastrous chemical spills polluted groundwater throughout Silicon Valley.

"The current landscape with respect to environmental knowledge about nanotechnology is eerily similar to the landscape of the 60s for basic chemicals," said Sheila Davis, Executive Director of SVTC. "Landmark environmental acts passed in the 70s and 80s are out dated and do not apply to nanotech. We also lack monitoring and detection technology, and cleanup practices have not been established."

Nanotechnology manipulates incredibly small particles, essentially using atoms and molecules as the basic building blocks for new materials with new and useful properties. Nanomaterials and processes are already used in a wide range of products, from sunscreens to solar panels, and nanotech is also being applied to new products in the medical, pharmaceutical, electronics, and environmental sectors. Smaller and increasingly complex nanomaterials are approaching the size of a single DNA molecule.

The biggest health and environmental concerns are due to the small size of nanomaterials, which have unprecedented mobility in the environment and in the body. Nanomaterials can readily enter the human body and gain access to the blood stream via inhalation and ingestion. Once in the blood stream these nanomaterials can circulate throughout the body and penetrate organs and tissues including the brain, liver, kidneys and nervous system.

SVTC is calling for new comprehensive state and federal regulatory policies that adequately address the potential hazards posed by nanotechnology. Nanotech represents a staggering number of essentially new materials and processes, most of which have not been adequately studied and do not fall under current environmental and health regulations. These materials are extremely diverse: many are highly reactive by design and have the potential for unexpected interactions with biological systems. Many nanomaterials (due to their extremely small size) pose potential hazards similar to those of other tiny particles such as asbestos.

SVTC's new report, Regulating Emerging Technologies in Silicon Valley and Beyond: Lessons from 1981 Chemical Spills in the Electronics Industry and Implications for Regulating Nanotechnology can be downloaded at: svtc.org/svtc_nanotech.

####

About The Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC)
Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition is a diverse organization engaged in research, advocacy, and grassroots organizing to promote human health and environmental justice in response to the rapid growth of the high-tech industry.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sheila Davis
415.846.6331

Copyright © The Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC)

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

University of Akron researchers find thin layers of water can become ice-like at room temperature: Results could lead to an assortment of anti-friction solutions August 30th, 2016

Nanocatalysis for organic chemistry: This research article by Dr. Qien Xu et al. is published in Current Organic Chemistry, Volume 20, Issue 19, 2016 August 30th, 2016

Continuous roll-process technology for transferring and packaging flexible LSI August 29th, 2016

Meteorite impact on a nano scale August 29th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube: DNA computers could one day be programmed to diagnose and treat disease August 25th, 2016

New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials August 25th, 2016

Johns Hopkins scientists track metabolic pathways to find drug combination for pancreatic cancer August 25th, 2016

New electrical energy storage material shows its power: Nanomaterial combines attributes of both batteries and supercapacitors August 25th, 2016

Announcements

University of Akron researchers find thin layers of water can become ice-like at room temperature: Results could lead to an assortment of anti-friction solutions August 30th, 2016

Nanocatalysis for organic chemistry: This research article by Dr. Qien Xu et al. is published in Current Organic Chemistry, Volume 20, Issue 19, 2016 August 30th, 2016

Continuous roll-process technology for transferring and packaging flexible LSI August 29th, 2016

Meteorite impact on a nano scale August 29th, 2016

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

University of Akron researchers find thin layers of water can become ice-like at room temperature: Results could lead to an assortment of anti-friction solutions August 30th, 2016

Nanocatalysis for organic chemistry: This research article by Dr. Qien Xu et al. is published in Current Organic Chemistry, Volume 20, Issue 19, 2016 August 30th, 2016

Continuous roll-process technology for transferring and packaging flexible LSI August 29th, 2016

Meteorite impact on a nano scale August 29th, 2016

Environment

Nanofur for oil spill cleanup: Materials researchers learn from aquatic ferns: Hairy plant leaves are highly oil-absorbing / publication in bioinspiration & biomimetics / video on absorption capacity August 25th, 2016

Researchers watch catalysts at work August 19th, 2016

Down to the wire: ONR researchers and new bacteria August 18th, 2016

SLAC, Stanford gadget grabs more solar energy to disinfect water faster: Plopped into water, a tiny device triggers the formation of chemicals that kill microbes in minutes August 15th, 2016

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

UK NANOSAFETY GROUP publishes 2nd Edition of guidance to support safe working with nanomaterials May 30th, 2016

PETA science group publishes a review on pulmonary effects of nanomaterials: Archives of Toxicology publishes a review of scientific studies on fibrotic potential of nanomaterials May 26th, 2016

Common nanoparticle has subtle effects on oxidative stress genes May 11th, 2016

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic