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Home > News > Hypercubes Could Be Building Blocks of Nanocomputers

April 2nd, 2008

Hypercubes Could Be Building Blocks of Nanocomputers

Abstract:
Multi-dimensional structures called hypercubes may act as the building blocks for tomorrow's nanocomputers - machines made of such tiny elements that they are dominated not by forces that we're familiar with every day, but by quantum properties.

As Samuel Lee and Loyd Hook from the University of Oklahoma explain, microelectronic devices are continually getting smaller and faster, in accordance with Moore's Law. Already, integrated circuits and transistors are reaching the nanometer scale, although they still operate based on the physical properties on the macro-scale. True nanoelectronics, the researchers explain, are not just scaled down microelectronics, but devices that will be dominated by quantum properties, and will therefore require new architectures and novel structures.

"Compared to today's microcomputers, the main advantages of future nanocomputers are higher circuit density, lower power consumption, faster computation speed and more parallel and distributed computing capabilities," Lee told PhysOrg.com.

Source:
physorg.com

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