Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Good Vibrations Probe Innards of Molecular Electronic Junctions

NIST researchers determined that the organic molecules in the middle of this simple silicon-based molecular “sandwich” pass electric current through these junctions by carefully measuring the minute changes in molecular vibrations.

Credit: NIST
NIST researchers determined that the organic molecules in the middle of this simple silicon-based molecular “sandwich” pass electric current through these junctions by carefully measuring the minute changes in molecular vibrations.
Credit: NIST

Abstract:
Using an unusual spectroscopic technique, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have provided the most convincing evidence yet that current is flowing through a simple silicon-based molecular "sandwich," which is the most basic structure of molecular electronics. The work* is an important step toward realizing the dream of organic molecule-based electronics that could enable much denser, cheaper computer memories and other replacements of traditional electronic devices.

Good Vibrations Probe Innards of Molecular Electronic Junctions

GAITHERSBURG, MD | Posted on March 6th, 2008

"The ultimate in miniaturization is the molecule," explains NIST's Curt Richter. "The hope is that a single molecule will one day be able to act as an electrical component such as a diode or a resistor with the ultimate goal being shrinking computer chips."

For the past few years, scientists have been building and testing structures made of a hybrid of traditional silicon-based components and more futuristic molecule-based components. The typical junction is a sandwich of a metallic contact layer, a layer of organic compound just a single molecule thick arranged like bristles on a brush, and a substrate of silicon. Richter says that while the electric current seems to pass through the molecules, the current could be finding a way around it or the molecules could have been damaged in fabrication. Scientists want to know what is really happening inside this "black box."

NIST researchers tried a little-used technique called inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) that measures the vibrations of the molecules inside the junction. "Each molecule has its own vibrational fingerprint," says Wenyong Wang, adding "IETS acts as our eyes to see what is inside the black box." An earlier paper by Wang and his colleagues at Yale University set IETS as a standard technique to prove that molecules remain intact in metal-based molecular electronic devices.

Colleagues at Purdue University provided three types of silicon-molecule-metal junctions that are a few micrometers large. The small molecules researchers used were octadecane, nitrobenzene and diethylaminobenzene.

Each silicon-molecule-metal device was cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Wang carefully measured the minute changes in the current passing through the junctions, and these current changes were then related to specific molecular vibrations. Thus, the researchers verified the existence of the molecules and that the electric current passed through them.

NIST physicists plan to continue research into silicon-molecule-metal junctions. "Once we understand the physics of the devices, we can begin to assess how viable the technology is and also determine which molecules may supply the best chance for a technological breakthrough," says Richter.

* W. Wang, A. Scott, N. Gergel-Hackett, C.A. Hacker, D.B. Janes and C.A. Richter. Probing molecules in integrated silicon-molecule-metal junctions by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. ACS Nano Letters, 8, 478 (2008).

####

About NIST
From automated teller machines and atomic clocks to mammograms and semiconductors, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Founded in 1901, NIST is a non-regulatory federal agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST's mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Evelyn Brown

(301) 975-5661

Copyright © NIST

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

MRI, on a molecular scale: Researchers develop system that could one day peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules April 20th, 2014

Iranian Researchers Present New Model to Strengthen Superconductivity at Higher Temperatures April 19th, 2014

Iranian Researchers Produce New Anti-Cancer Drug from Turmeric April 19th, 2014

Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair April 18th, 2014

Chip Technology

'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin April 18th, 2014

Scientists open door to better solar cells, superconductors and hard-drives: Research enhances understanding of materials interfaces April 14th, 2014

Obducat has launched a new generation of SINDRE® Nano Imprint production system April 11th, 2014

Scientists in Singapore develop novel ultra-fast electrical circuits using light-generated tunneling currents April 10th, 2014

Nanoelectronics

Better solar cells, better LED light and vast optical possibilities April 12th, 2014

Catching the (Invisible) Wave: UC Santa Barbara researchers create a unique semiconductor that manipulates light in the invisible infrared/terahertz range, paving the way for new and enhanced applications April 11th, 2014

Nanotech Business Review 2013-2014 April 9th, 2014

Preview of Hands-on Nanotechnology Demos at ‘Chemistry of Wine’ Fundraiser to Show Nanotech Magic April 8th, 2014

Discoveries

MRI, on a molecular scale: Researchers develop system that could one day peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules April 20th, 2014

Iranian Researchers Present New Model to Strengthen Superconductivity at Higher Temperatures April 19th, 2014

Iranian Researchers Produce New Anti-Cancer Drug from Turmeric April 19th, 2014

'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin April 18th, 2014

Announcements

MRI, on a molecular scale: Researchers develop system that could one day peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules April 20th, 2014

Iranian Researchers Present New Model to Strengthen Superconductivity at Higher Temperatures April 19th, 2014

Iranian Researchers Produce New Anti-Cancer Drug from Turmeric April 19th, 2014

Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair April 18th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE







  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE