Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Is Hybridoma Production About to Take a Quantum Leap Forward?

Abstract:
Recently published research* has established the ability of NeowaterŪ to enhance the various processes involved in the production of pure human monoclonal antibodies by refining the standard hybridoma production process.

Is Hybridoma Production About to Take a Quantum Leap Forward?

Israel | Posted on February 15th, 2008



* "ENHANCEMENT OF HYBRIDOMA FORMATION, CLONEABILITY AND CELL PROLIFERATION IN A NANOPARTICLE-DOPED AQUEOUS ENVIRONMENT", authored by Natalie Gavrilov-Yusim1, Ekaterina Hahiashvili1, Marina Tashker1, Victoria Yavelsky1, Ohad Karnieli2 and Leslie Lobel1
( 1Department of Virology and Developmental Genetics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-sheva 84105, Israel
2Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel)



Biopharmaceutical companies have started to evaluate the use of fully human monoclonal antibodies as a complementary or primary therapeutic agent against a variety of diseases. The most obvious advantage would be to bypass the interference from the patient's immune system that typically characterizes the use of chemerical or humanized antibodies. Due to the growing interest and the potential benefits, the efficient production of human monoclonal antibodies is a high priority. But any attempt to produce these by natural means encounters formidable obstacles, not only from an ethical standpoint but also from the difficulty inherent in generating human antibodies against human tissues.

The capacity to humanize monoclonal antibodies in 1988 through hybridoma cell production methods opened exciting new vistas in R&D and biomed products. If this method could be further refined to produce pure, natural human monoclonal antibodies, research would take a quantum leap forward in the development of new medical and pharmaceutical discoveries for serious and life-threatening conditions that cannot yet be successfully treated with synthesized hybrids.

One proven way to profoundly enhance the media solutions used for cell growth, and particularly membrane proteins, is Radio Frequency (RF) radiation. The RF is absorbed by the aqueous solution and stimulates new membrane formation - a vital stage in hybridoma cell growth. The problem is that the beneficial effect decays once the source of RF is removed, and the new membrane formation does not receive the full benefit. Without this extra "boost", the delicate process of producing viable, fully human monoclonal antibodies faces an insurmountable obstacle.

This obstacle has been effectively removed by NeowaterŪ, a novel nanoparticle-doped (NPD) water created by a unique patented water-based nanotechnology.

NeowaterŪ is a non-toxic form of water that mimics intracellular water, which is found uniquely in the human body and its cells. NPD water is characterized by a shifting in the physical properties of ordinary water, imparting new levels of compatibility with hydrophobic substances. NeowaterŪ also maintains the beneficial effect of RF radiation on water for years after its production, thanks to its extraordinary structural stability.

The researchers performed numerous experiments to test the growth rate of hybridoma cells in NPD-based media. They specifically tested the effect of the NPD environment on the complete process of human monoclonal antibody production, and their results were published recently in the BMC Biotechnology Journal.

To evaluate the hybridoma formation process (utilizing the chemical fusion method), the researchers received samples of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from several donors; each sample was tested either in a NPD or a DI (de-ionized) environment. In referring to the results, the researchers stated: "We witnessed a statistically significant difference in the yield of hybridoma cells between NPD and DI environments."

In another experiment, the isolation of subclones and autocrine activity of hybridoma cells was tested. The researchers reported: "We observed greater clonal outgrowth of antibody-secreting hybridoma cells in NPD-based media as compared to DI-based media." Moreover, they found that "the cloneability of cells from a semi-stable clone is also enhanced in NPD-based media."

The researchers noted that hybridoma clones grown on NPD-based media secreted more monoclonal antibodies into their environment. However, they also observed that "Some cells grow faster in NPD-based media…This result might not reflect greater secretion per cell, but rather greater proliferation of cells with a similar secretion." After normalization of this biased situation, the researchers calculated that "the secretion of monoclonal antibody in NPD-based media is roughly twice that obtained in DI-based media."

This interesting and unexpected result led the researchers to conduct further tests: To what extent are cell proliferation rates affected by NPD-based media? Growing CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary) cells in NPD-based and DI-based media, the researchers observed an unmistakable increase in proliferation when cells were incubated in NPD-based media, in comparison to the DI-based media: "an increase by an average of nearly 30%" .

The researchers then tested the proliferation rate of primary human fibroblast cells incubated either in NPD-based or DI-based media. Unlike the CHO cells, these are sensitive to cell density and were grown at two different starting dilutions. Here the NPD-based media had the opposite effect: the CHO cells displayed a slower proliferation rate than that of DI-based media (in both dilutions). The researchers concluded: "As is evident from the curves, primary human fibroblasts proliferated poorly in NPD-based media, compared to DI-based media.... they appear to sense the lower effective cell density."

The above paper demonstrates the remarkable power of NeowaterŪ for enhancing the stabilization, activity and proliferation of cells and antibodies - as well as inhibiting the proliferation of other cells. This is just one example of the wide research potential that NeowaterŪ offers, which will eventually impact the healthcare industry. Imagine the novel and cutting-edge methodologies suddenly available to stem-cell therapeutics, site-specific antibody treatments, and targeted anti-cancer drugs using fully human mAbs.

Many promising biomed and therapeutic concepts that have been shelved, blocked by the basic difference between regular water and intracellular water, can now cross the "molecular water barrier", thanks to the nanoparticle restructuring capability of NeowaterŪ. We can expect a new era in R&D as these concepts are facilitated by NeowaterŪ technology and find realization in therapeutic applications.

####

About Do-Coop Technologies Ltd.
Do-Coop Technologies Ltd. is a private company based in Israel. Do-Coop was formed in 1997 in order to develop and commercialize novel water-based materials using Nanotechnology for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and chemical industries as well as additional industries.

Do-Coop has developed a patented Nanotechnology to modify the properties of water using nanometer (one billionth of a meter) size particles (nanoparticles) that enables the first ever introduction of water-based biomaterials. The company has spent over seven years developing and optimizing its first line of products, branded as NeowaterŪ. Do-Coop has recently started commercialization of its first line of NeowaterŪ-based products targeting the molecular diagnostics and research market within the Life Sciences industry.Do-Coop is also offering a new solubilization service for Pharma and Biotech companies to enhance bioavailability and solubility of existing and new drugs.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Do-Coop Technologies Ltd.
3B Yoni Netanyahu St.
Or-Yehuda 60376, Israel
Tel: (+972) 3 5333804
Fax: (+972) 3 5333847

USA (Bus Dev) Office:
55 Madison Ave. Suite 400
Morristown, NJ 07960
Tel: (+1) 973 285-3366

Copyright © Do-Coop Technologies Ltd.

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Aculon Hires New Business Development Director December 19th, 2014

Nanomedicine

Creation of 'Rocker' protein opens way for new smart molecules in medicine, other fields December 18th, 2014

Iranian Researchers Produce Electrical Pieces Usable in Human Body December 18th, 2014

Unraveling the light of fireflies December 17th, 2014

First Home-Made Edible Herbal Nanodrug Presented to Pharmacies across Iran December 17th, 2014

Announcements

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Aculon Hires New Business Development Director December 19th, 2014

Water

Unraveling the light of fireflies December 17th, 2014

Biomimetic dew harvesters: Understanding how a desert beetle harvests water from dew could improve drinking water collection in dew condensers December 8th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Refine Wastewater of Nuclear Power Plants Using Nanoparticles December 1st, 2014

Iranian Experts Clean Uranium-Contaminated Water by Nano-Particles November 23rd, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE