Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > One electron makes all the difference

Abstract:
A research team from the department of condensed matter physics of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid working in collaboration with the research group lead by professor Christian Schoenenberger at the Basilea university in Switzerland, have discovered that just an electron sets the conductive properties of a carbon nanotube.

One electron makes all the difference

Madrid, Spain | Posted on February 13th, 2008

Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have continually fascinated physicists and chemists with their amazing electronic and mechanical properties.

These cylindrical molecules with a radius of a few Angstroms (110-10 meters) and with lengths of up to several micrometers (110-6 meters) have endless applications inside different scientific fields from nanoelectronics to material science, and are used by scientists to study a wide range of physical phenomena that only take place at a nanometric scale. The combination of nanotubes and other materials form hybrid structures and these are of particular interest. For example, carbon nanotubes connected to superconductive electrodes (materials that offer no electrical resistance at low temperatures) are currently being used to study exotic physical phenomena like the Josephson Effect. This Nobel Prize winning discovery made by physicist Brian D. Josephson in 1973 consists of the almost magic effect of producing an electrical current in a superconductive junction without the application of a voltage.

In the last two three years several research groups have demonstrated that in a carbon nanotube held in between superconducting electrodes, the Josephson effect can be controlled at will, making possible a superconductive version of a transistor. This discovery has endless possibilities, most of which have barely started to be investigated.

A research group from the UAM working in collaboration with a research team lead by Christian Schoenenberger of Basilea University, has recently published an article in the Physical Review Letters, where a new phenomenon that takes place within these nanotube-superconductor structures has been described.

Demonstrating that carbon nanotubes truly are an endless supply of new physical phenomena, they have discovered that when a voltage is applied to these hybrid structures, the electric current that flows depends greatly on the number of electrons that are present at the nanotube, and furthermore, whether this number is even or odd has a drastic impact. This new transport phenomenon is caused by subtle interactions between the Spins (magnetic field produced by the electrons as they rotate) of the electrons in the carbon nanotubes - a characteristic which depends on their number and the conducting electrons in the superconductor.

####

Copyright © Universidad Autonoma de Madrid

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale January 20th, 2017

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Captured on video: DNA nanotubes build a bridge between 2 molecular posts: Research may lead to new lines of direct communication with cells January 9th, 2017

Nano-chimneys can cool circuits: Rice University scientists calculate tweaks to graphene would form phonon-friendly cones January 4th, 2017

WPI researchers build liquid biopsy chip that detects metastatic cancer cells in blood December 15th, 2016

Infrared instrumentation leader secures exclusive use of Vantablack coating December 5th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Nano-chimneys can cool circuits: Rice University scientists calculate tweaks to graphene would form phonon-friendly cones January 4th, 2017

Advance in intense pulsed light sintering opens door to improved electronics manufacturing December 23rd, 2016

Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits December 16th, 2016

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Demonstrates Industry-Leading 56Gbps Long-Reach SerDes on Advanced 14nm FinFET Process Technology: Proven ASIC IP solution will enable significant performance and power efficiency improvements for next-generation high-speed applications December 13th, 2016

Discoveries

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale January 20th, 2017

Announcements

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale January 20th, 2017

Chemists Cook up New Nanomaterial and Imaging Method: Nanomaterials can store all kinds of things, including energy, drugs and other cargo January 19th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project