Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > ASU paves way for bioscience education

Abstract:
To help meet the need of Arizona's booming bioscience sector and create the next generation of highly skilled, interdisciplinary scientists, the Arizona Board of Regents recently approved an innovative ASU graduate degree in biological design.

ASU paves way for bioscience education

Tempe, AZ | Posted on December 15th, 2007

The biological design doctoral program seeks to attract and train new scientific talent to use an outcome-driven, interdisciplinary approach in solving major global challenges in human health and the environment. The program is a collaboration between ASU's Biodesign Institute, the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

"The challenges for the next generation of scientists are more complex and inter-related than ever before," explains Biodesign Institute researcher Neal Woodbury, who directs the institute's Center for BioOptical Nanotechnology and is a professor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. "Problems as seemingly unrelated as global pandemics, the need for better medical diagnostics and environmental deterioration all stand to benefit from a convergence of technologies from multiple fields of science. Our goal is to teach students to work in interdisciplinary teams that focus on solving a large-scale problem, rather than working independently on an isolated piece of that problem, which is the more traditional approach."

The new program reflects ASU's commitment to "use-inspired" research, one of seven imperatives outlined in 2002 by ASU President Michael Crow as part of the university's 10-year strategic plan.

An executive committee including individuals from across ASU's bioscience, engineering, informatics and mathematics academic units spearheaded the effort to create the new doctoral program.

According to electrical engineering professor Trevor Thornton, a member of the biological design doctoral graduate program's executive committee, the main challenge was designing a curriculum to meet the mission of multidisciplinary, solution-driven research.

"An undergraduate curriculum allows a student to gain mastery of an individual discipline," Thornton says. "The biological design Ph.D. program will allow students to apply their core expertise to multidisciplinary projects while providing them with the skills they need to work with scientists and engineers from other disciplines."

The doctoral program consists of a two-semester core course sequence to provide training in bio-related areas. There, doctoral candidates will receive intensive training in all the relevant biology-related areas (including biophysics, biomedical engineering, biochemistry and molecular biology) combined with emergent disciplines, including synthetic biology, systems biology, artificial tissues and drug development.

More than 100 ASU participating faculty will be eligible to mentor students in the program. Initially, 15 students will be recruited each year, generating a total student enrollment of around 60 students by the fourth year.

Science is in the midst of a profound transformation, with increasingly complex data sets and problems requiring a large, interdisciplinary team approach combining the biological sciences, physical sciences, engineering and computing. Arizona has been on the fast track in creating a collaborative environment for success.

To catalyze Arizona efforts, the state heavily invested in advancing its research portfolio at its universities with more than $400 million in capital improvements including: ASU's Biodesign Institute and Interdisciplinary Science and Technical Buildings (I, II, III); the University of

Arizona's BIO5; the expansion of the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partnership with Arizona State University; and the new Arizona Biomedical Collaborative building, home of ASU's School of Biomedical Informatics.

These significant investments have been matched by the recruitment of top scientific talent to fill the research space and jump-start new statewide scientific initiatives. A report from the nonprofit Flinn Foundation assessing education needs in the bioscience arena notes that bioscience and high-tech organizations statewide are increasingly dependent on students trained in interdisciplinary, use-inspired science for expansion, growth and economic success.

"We will put great emphasis on individual mentoring of the students," says Stephen Albert Johnston, a faculty member in the School of Life Sciences within the College of Liberal Arts and director of the Center for Innovations in Medicine at the Biodesign Institute. "We want their time with the program to be effective - and, therefore, I expect most students to finish in four to five years."

Students will explore interdisciplinary areas of greatest interest and have a large impact in topics such as biofuels, nanoscience, human-computer interfaces, personalized medicine and infectious disease. Students will have an almost unlimited menu of courses to take from academic units in science and engineering, as well as appropriate training courses in law, policy, sociology and business. This will serve to create a highly flexible degree program focused on preparing student for interdisciplinary careers in science and engineering or the application of science and engineering fundamentals to commercial, legal, political or social realms.

Students will receive a highly competitive stipend, plus full tuition reimbursement and health care benefits.

The program is supported by state funds from the Technology Research Infrastructure Fund, Science Foundation Arizona, and individual investigator research grants.

The deadline for applicants to the fall 2008 program is Jan. 1.

For more information and to apply online, visit the Web site http://www.biologicaldesign.asu.edu .

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Gary Campbell
Web Editor/Publisher
(480) 965-7209
Administration Building, room B353
Campus mail: 1803 ­ASU Insight
Phone: (480) 965-3502
FAX: (480) 965-2159

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Academic/Education

SUNY Poly NanoCollege Faculty Member Selected as American Physical Society Fellow: SUNY Poly Associate Professor of Nanoscience Dr. Vincent LaBella Recognized for Significant Technological Innovations that Enable Interactive Learning December 17th, 2014

Nanomedicine expert joins Rice faculty: Gang Bao combines genetic, nano and imaging techniques to fight disease December 17th, 2014

FEI and Oregon Health & Science University Install a Complete Correlative Microscopy Workflow in Newly Built Collaborative Science Facility December 16th, 2014

Student Nanotechnology Laboratories Network Set Up in Iran December 15th, 2014

Announcements

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Aculon Hires New Business Development Director December 19th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE