Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Susan G. Komen for the Cure Announces Recipients of 2007 Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction

Abstract:
Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the global leader in the movement to end breast cancer forever, has announced the recipients of the 2007 Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction, the organization's highest award of merit.

Susan G. Komen for the Cure Announces Recipients of 2007 Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction

Dallas, TX | Posted on December 12th, 2007

This year's recipients are Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., professor, department of preventive medicine and the inaugural holder of the AFLAC, Inc. Chair in Cancer Research at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and Joe W. Gray, Ph.D., director, division of life sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.

Dr. Bernstein and Dr. Gray will be formally recognized during the 30th annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), a major international gathering of breast cancer researchers, clinicians and patient advocacy organizations, Dec. 13-16 in San Antonio. The two recipients will deliver lectures for SABCS attendees at 3:45 p.m. Dec. 13 in Exhibit Hall D of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. Both will receive cash awards of $25,000 and a crystal award.

The Art and Science of Delivering the Cures

The evening of Dec. 13, Susan G. Komen for the Cure founder Ambassador Nancy G. Brinker will be the featured speaker at a gala dinner held at the Gonzalez Center in honor of the Komen Brinker award recipients. In recognition of the art and the science involved in both research and clinical endeavors, Komen has themed the evening 'Toward a Culture of Discovery: Progress and Passion in the Search for the Cures.' Susan G. Komen for the Cure's Art for the Cure program, which features a special traveling exhibition of Ambassador Brinker's collection of Hungarian art, will be featured at the dinner event to celebrate the organizations 25th anniversary and the 15th anniversary of the Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction.

The Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction was established in 1992 to honor the efforts of acknowledged pioneers in two critically important components of the fight to end breast cancer: clinical work and basic research. Since the award's establishment, the roster of Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction laureates has grown to include names of researchers connected with some of the most significant advancements made in the way breast cancer is diagnosed and treated as well as the way research into the disease is conducted. This year, former Komen Brinker award laureates will also be acknowledged for their achievements.

Bernstein: Pioneer in Linking Exercise, Breast Cancer Risk

Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., pioneered research on the link between physical activity and breast cancer, which is now well established. This research provides an evidence base for one of the few recommendations that can be made for breast cancer risk reduction. In addition to her studies on physical activity, she has contributed to the study of body size, including weight gain and obesity, another area of inquiry that has yielded insights into breast cancer risk reduction for post-menopausal women.

As director of the Los Angeles Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Registry, Dr. Bernstein is a leader in efforts to understand patterns in breast cancer incidence, including the troubling rise in risk among new immigrants to California. This work is fundamental to efforts in addressing breast cancer disparities and in anticipating risk among Asian-American women. Dr. Bernstein has a long and distinguished history of leadership at the University of Southern California, where she has advanced opportunities for women in science while serving as a model for the next generation of research professionals.

Dr. Bernstein will receive the 2007 Komen Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction in the category of clinical research.

Gray: Developing Technology to Solve Challenging Biomedical Problems

Joe W. Gray, Ph.D., is recognized as a pioneer in the development of innovative technologies that enable researchers to pursue original avenues of inquiry into challenging biomedical problems. The sum of his impact, innovation and creativity over the course of his career are directly linked to translational research which many leading scientists acknowledge will lead to real improvements for people living with breast cancer.

He is credited with the development and implementation of many important technologies, including high-speed sorting; flow karyotyping; the first chromosome painting probes; development of interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH); and the first demonstration using FISH showing ERBB2 amplification and BCR-ABL translocation, both of which are critically important to current patient management. His list of credits also includes brdU/DNA analysis of cell cycle progression; comparative genomic hybribidization (CGH); BAC End Sequencing (BES) and, more recently, nanotechnology.

Dr. Gray was an early adopter of technologies such as transcriptional profiling, high throughput analysis, SNP array CGH and molecular inversion probes. By integrating data received from these technologies, Dr. Gray has made significant advancements in developing methods that will lead to improved patient outcomes. Specifically, his work is leading to groundbreaking research in the determination of how to improve breast cancer detection and treatment. His efforts are helping to increase the translation of basic research to the clinic. Dr. Gray is a staunch proponent of collaborative, or "team" science. He supports an active academic-industrial collaborative enterprise to encourage industry to invest in, develop and implement technologies needed to combat breast cancer.

####

About Susan G. Komen for the Cure
Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan G. Komen, she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. In 1982, that promise became Susan G. Komen for the Cure and launched the global breast cancer movement. Today, Komen for the Cure is the world's largest grassroots network of breast cancer survivors and activists fighting to save lives, empower people, ensure quality care for all and energize science to find the cures. Thanks to events like the Komen Race for the Cure, we have invested nearly $1 billion to fulfill our promise, becoming the largest source of nonprofit funds dedicated to the fight against breast cancer in the world.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
1-877 GO KOMEN

Copyright © PR Newswire Association LLC.

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Nanomedicine

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Production of Biocompatible Polymers in Iran October 30th, 2014

Amorphous Coordination Polymer Particles as alternative to classical nanoplatforms for nanomedicine October 30th, 2014

'Electronic skin' could improve early breast cancer detection October 29th, 2014

Announcements

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Microrockets fueled by water neutralize chemical and biological warfare agents October 29th, 2014

New nanodevice to improve cancer treatment monitoring October 27th, 2014

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE