Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Mixed results: Combining scaffold ingredients yields surprising nanoporous structure

Abstract:
With a novel twist on existing techniques used to create porous crystals, University of Michigan researchers have developed a new, high-capacity material that may be useful in storing hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide.

Mixed results: Combining scaffold ingredients yields surprising nanoporous structure

ANN ARBOR, MI | Posted on December 12th, 2007

The work builds on a worldwide research effort in the area of porous coordination polymers with high surface areas. Omar Yaghi, a former U-M professor and pioneer in this area coined the term metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for these materials, which can be described as scaffolds made up of metal hubs linked together with struts of organic compounds. Typically, MOFs are made by combining one type of metal with one type of organic linker, but Matzger's team tried a new strategy: mixing two types of linkers with one metal (zinc).

The result was not a mixture of two types of MOFs, as might be expected, but an entirely new material, dubbed UMCM-1 (University of Michigan Crystalline Material-1), whose structure differs dramatically from that of all known MOFs.

The UMCM-1 structure is made up of six, microporous cage-like structures surrounding a hexagonal channel. The channel, categorized as a mesopore (a pore in the two- to 50-nanometer range), "is like a highway connecting all the microporous cages," a feature that might expedite filling the micropores, said Matzger, an associate professor of chemistry. Researchers have been tinkering with porous materials, trying to improve their capacities, in hopes of finding ways to compactly store large amounts of hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and other economically and environmentally important gases.

The mixed-linker approach "exponentially increases the possibilities" for making new, porous materials, Matzger said. In addition, because it allows for mixing a less-expensive linker with a more expensive one, it could lead to substantial cost savings.

Matzger's coauthors on the paper are postdoctoral researcher Kyoungmoo Koh and research scientist Antek Wong-Foy. The researchers received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Their latest results were published online Dec. 4 in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
412 MAYNARD STREET
ANN ARBOR, MI
48109-1399
PHONE: (734)764-7260
FAX: (734) 764-7084

Nancy Ross-Flanigan
Phone: (734) 647-1853

Copyright © University of Michigan

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Discoveries

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

Detecting Cancer Earlier is Goal of Rutgers-Developed Medical Imaging Technology: Rare earth nanocrystals and infrared light can reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions October 21st, 2014

Announcements

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

Detecting Cancer Earlier is Goal of Rutgers-Developed Medical Imaging Technology: Rare earth nanocrystals and infrared light can reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions October 21st, 2014

Energy

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

First Canada Excellence Research Chair gets $10 million from the federal government for oilsands research at the University of Calgary: Federal government announces prestigious research chair to study improving oil production efficiency October 19th, 2014

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways October 16th, 2014

Unique catalysts for hydrogen fuel cells synthesized in ordinary kitchen microwave oven October 14th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE