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Home > News > Q and A: Mark Lythgoe interview

August 31st, 2007

Q and A: Mark Lythgoe interview

Abstract:
CNN: What stage has the research reached now?

Lythgoe: We've been developing both the nanotechnology side of things -- the small iron filings that we're able to put into the stem cells -- and the different types of magnets so that we can attract the stem cells to the site of the damaged blood vessel when they are loaded up with the iron filings.

CNN: Finally, can you tell us your ultimate goal?

Lythgoe: I have two main aims, really. From the point of view of science I would love to be able to make a genuine difference to people's lives. I would love to find a treatment for the kids that we see at the hospital who have epilepsy or stroke.

Source:
cnn.com

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