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Home > News > Scientists study concrete to make it 'greener'

August 19th, 2007

Scientists study concrete to make it 'greener'

Abstract:
A team of researchers is working to make concrete "greener."

Using nanotechnology, they're exploring the possibility of creating a new type of concrete - eventually replacing some of the cement in concrete with industrial waste materials, like blast furnace slag, which would otherwise end up in a landfill.

Today, cement is concrete's main ingredient. The process that makes it burns large amounts of fossil fuels, releasing greenhouse gases and contributing to global warming.

Source:
earthsky.org

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