Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > New nanotoxicology study delivers promising results

Abstract:
Findings by a team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee bode well for using single-walled carbon nanohorns, a particular form of engineered carbon-based nanoparticles, for drug delivery and other commercial applications.

New nanotoxicology study delivers promising results

OAK RIDGE, TN | Posted on August 17th, 2007

In results to be published in the journal Nanotoxicology (http://www.nanotoxicology.net), a team led by Meng-Dawn Cheng of ORNL's Environmental Sciences Division reported no pulmonary toxicity issues for single-walled carbon nanohorns. These findings are contrary to numerous studies in rats involving single-walled carbon nanotubes that have different shapes and sizes than those of nanohorns.

"We think the difference could be due to the lack of metal contaminants in single-walled carbon nanohorns as compared to single-walled carbon nanotubes, although many factors could be the cause as well," said one of the co-authors, Brynn Voy of ORNL's Biosciences Division.

Nanohorns are short, horn-shaped tubular structures capped with a conical tip. Individual nanohorns tend to cluster and form a Dahlia, or star-like, structure between 50 nanometers and 100 nanometers in diameter with the tips of individual nanohorns projecting outward from the center in all directions.

Of particular relevance is the fact nanohorns can be produced through simple laser ablation of a pure carbon target without the use of transition metal catalysts. Researchers theorize that the metal contaminants might be the cause of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress reported in inhalation studies using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

"Our primary objective in this study was to characterize the pulmonary response of single-wall carbon nanohorns and compare our results to published data concerning single-wall carbon nanotubes," the authors wrote. They acknowledge that the two forms of nanostructures can be vastly different in eliciting biological responses so they took great care in making the comparison.

In addition to nanohorns' potential for drug delivery purposes, researchers believe they can be useful for hydrogen storage in energy and fuel cell applications. Authors of the paper believe carbon nanohorns could find large-scale applications sooner than carbon nanotubes because they are easier to produce and because of the likelihood that they do not pose a health hazard.

Other authors of the paper, Assessing the Pulmonary Toxicity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns, are Rachel Lynch of ORNL's Biosciences Division, Dana Glass and Shannon Mahurin of the Environmental Sciences Division, and Arnold Saxton and Robert Donnell of the University of Tennessee. This research was funded through the ORNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

UT-Battelle manages Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ron Walli
Communications and External Relations
865.576.0226

Copyright © Oak Ridge National Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Nanomedicine

Silk bio-ink could help advance tissue engineering with 3-D printers September 2nd, 2015

Using DNA origami to build nanodevices of the future September 1st, 2015

Efficiency of Nanodrug Containing Antibiotics in Treatment of Infectious Diseases Evaluated August 31st, 2015

Researchers use DNA 'clews' to shuttle CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells August 30th, 2015

Discoveries

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base: Rice University theorists show flat boron form would depend on metal substrates September 2nd, 2015

Silk bio-ink could help advance tissue engineering with 3-D printers September 2nd, 2015

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered September 2nd, 2015

A marine creature's magic trick explained: Crystal structures on the sea sapphire's back appear differently depending on the angle of reflection September 2nd, 2015

Announcements

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base: Rice University theorists show flat boron form would depend on metal substrates September 2nd, 2015

Silk bio-ink could help advance tissue engineering with 3-D printers September 2nd, 2015

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered September 2nd, 2015

A marine creature's magic trick explained: Crystal structures on the sea sapphire's back appear differently depending on the angle of reflection September 2nd, 2015

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Sustainable nanotechnology center September 1st, 2015

$200K Awarded to Develop In Vitro Lung Test for Toxicity of Inhaled Nanomaterials: In Vitro Lung Test Designed to Protect Human Health and Replace Animal Testing September 1st, 2015

Warning to DIY enthusiasts & construction workers as dangerous dust emissions August 19th, 2015

Bionic liver micro-organs explain off-target toxicity of acetaminophen (Tylenol): Israeli-German partnership aims to replace animal experiments with advanced liver-on-chip devices August 17th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic