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Home > News > A big push gains on small scale

August 17th, 2007

A big push gains on small scale

Abstract:
Liquids sometimes would find their way into the porous silicon that researchers at the University at Albany were working with, complicating their efforts to use it in optical reflectors and other applications.

But when Ryk E. Spoor, research and development coordinator at International Electronic Machines Corp., an Albany-based measurement and sensor manufacturer, wanted to make a hydration sensor for the military, porous silicon fit the bill.


Now, IEM and the Center for Advanced Technology in Nanomaterials and Nanoelectronics at UAlbany's College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering are in the second phase of developing tiny sensors for the military. The sensors would be implanted on a tooth in a soldier's mouth, alerting commanding officers to dehydration.

Source:
timesunion.com

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