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Home > News > Is fullerene toxicity a myth?

August 15th, 2007

Is fullerene toxicity a myth?

Abstract:
In 2004 to 2005, a series of articles was published by different authors about fullerene toxicity, the series being initiated with reports by E. Obersdorster from Dallas University (USA) and V. Colvin from Rice University. It was noted in particular that the fish swimming in the water with the fullerene solution added into it experiences changes in the brain structure, and human skin cells die upon contact with the fullerene solution. These data allowed the authors of the articles to draw attention to environmental consequences of applying nanotechnologies, where fullerenes are of great importance. Apparently, once these technologies are eventually applied in industry, waste products will appear that contain such nanoparticles. The question arises as to how strict the requirements to such wastes should be?

The Kharkov researchers guided by G.V. Andrievsky, Ph. D. (Chemistry), called in question validity of fullerene apprehension. "We have been dealing with the fullerene aqueous solutions for more than ten years, and so far noticed no irritant impact on the skin. Moreover, aqueous solutions of pure fullerenes (i.e., no functional groups are attached to their surface) have positive biological effect and act as antioxidants.

Source:
nanowerk.com

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