Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Antibody Targets Nanotubes to Tumors

Abstract:
Researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have created biocompatible single-walled carbon nanotubes that can target lymphomas and deliver both imaging and therapeutic molecules to these tumors. Reporting its work in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the research team describes the methods it used to create these targeted, multifunctional nanotubes and its initial in vitro and in vivo test results. David Scheinberg, M.D., Ph.D., led the team of investigators.

Antibody Targets Nanotubes to Tumors

Bethesda , MD | Posted on July 23rd, 2007

Starting with water-soluble carbon nanotubes, which recent work has shown are nontoxic to human cells, Scheinberg's group created a construct that included a tumor-targeting antibody, a fluorescent imaging probe, and a radioactive therapeutic agent. Each nanotube, which contained approximately six antibody molecules and 114 radioactive atoms, proved to be stable in human plasma for at least 96 hours and was able to bind to targeted tumor cells. Most importantly, according to the researchers, the chemical linkages binding the radioactive element indium-111 was completely stable in human plasma for the entire 4-day experiment.

Tests using a mouse model of human lymphoma showed that this nanotube construct successfully targeted tumors while avoiding healthy cells. The researchers note that the antibody alone, that is, one not attached to a carbon nanotube, bound better to tumor cells than did the nanotube construct; they believe this difference is a result of not yet optimizing the methods they used to attach the antibodies to the carbon nanotubes.

This work, which was supported by the National Cancer Institute, is detailed in the paper "Tumor targeting with antibody-functionalized, radiolabeled carbon nanotubes." An investigator from Cornell University also participated in this study. An abstract of this paper is available through PubMed.

####

About National Cancer Institute
To help meet the goal of eliminating suffering and death due to cancer, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, is engaged in efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat and prevent cancer.

The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is a comprehensive, systematized initiative encompassing the public and private sectors, designed to accelerate the application of the best capabilities of nanotechnology to cancer.

Currently, scientists are limited in their ability to turn promising molecular discoveries into benefits for cancer patients. Nanotechnology can provide the technical power and tools that will enable those developing new diagnostics, therapeutics, and preventives to keep pace with today’s explosion in knowledge.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
National Cancer Institute
Office of Technology & Industrial Relations
ATTN: NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer
Building 31, Room 10A49
31 Center Drive , MSC 2580
Bethesda , MD 20892-2580

Copyright © National Cancer Institute

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

View abstract

Related News Press

Discoveries

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

New chip makes testing for antibiotic-resistant bacteria faster, easier: Researchers at the University of Toronto design diagnostic chip to reduce testing time from days to one hour, allowing doctors to pick the right antibiotic the first time May 28th, 2015

Announcements

TCL Unveils First 65” TV Featuring QD Vision’s Color IQ™ Quantum Dot Technology: Emerging industry leader introduces expanded quantum dot TV lineup May 30th, 2015

Nanotech Secures Additional Patents in Advanced Security Features: New patented features gain attention from the banknote industry May 30th, 2015

New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance May 30th, 2015

Two UCSB Professors Receive Early Career Research Awards: The Department of Energy’s award for young scientists acknowledges UC Santa Barbara’s standing as a top tier research institution May 29th, 2015

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance May 30th, 2015

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project