Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > News > http://www.separationsnow.com/coi/cda/detail.cda?id=16683&type=Feature&chId=2&page=1

July 16th, 2007

http://www.separationsnow.com/coi/cda/detail.cda?id=16683&type=Feature&chId=2&page=1

Abstract:
The ability to separate single molecules by electrophoresis is fast becoming a reality, following the latest work by Swedish and French chemists into the transport mechanisms that hold sway in tiny lipid nanotubes. By monitoring the migration of different size nanoparticles at different electric potentials, the chemists discovered that these mechanisms are heavily dependent on the interaction between the solid nanoparticles and the soft nanotube walls.

In 2005, a team of chemists from Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, and the Institut Curie, Paris, including Björn Åkerman from Chalmers, showed that they could separate individual DNA strands in a lipid nanotube with a radius of only 150nm. To produce this nanotube, the chemists developed a technique in which they first create a fluid-filled unilamellar liposome (essentially a bubble of fat with a single bilayer membrane). Next, they insert two electrodes into opposite sides of the liposome and then withdraw one of the electrodes, pulling out a 125μm-long lipid nanotube.

Source:
separationsnow.com

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Boron atoms stretch out, gain new powers: Rice University simulations demonstrate 1-D material's stiffness, electrical versatility January 26th, 2017

New stem cell technique shows promise for bone repair January 25th, 2017

Captured on video: DNA nanotubes build a bridge between 2 molecular posts: Research may lead to new lines of direct communication with cells January 9th, 2017

Nano-chimneys can cool circuits: Rice University scientists calculate tweaks to graphene would form phonon-friendly cones January 4th, 2017

Discoveries

Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes: KFU bionanotechnology lab (head - Dr. Rawil Fakhrullin) has obtained 3-D images of nematodes' cuticles February 23rd, 2017

Molecular phenomenon discovered by advanced NMR facility: Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling into different forms when passing between solution state to solid state, and back again - a curious phenomenon in science - says research by the University of Wa February 22nd, 2017

Tiny nanoclusters could solve big problems for lithium-ion batteries February 21st, 2017

Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms: In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport February 20th, 2017

Announcements

Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes: KFU bionanotechnology lab (head - Dr. Rawil Fakhrullin) has obtained 3-D images of nematodes' cuticles February 23rd, 2017

Particle Works creates range of high performance quantum dots February 23rd, 2017

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announces Availability of 45nm RF SOI to Advance 5G Mobile Communications: Optimized RF features deliver high-performance solutions for mmWave beam forming applications in 5G smartphones and base stations February 22nd, 2017

EmTech Asia breaks new barriers with potential applications of space exploration with NASA and MIT February 22nd, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project