Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Researchers Hope to Unlock Capabilities of Carbon Nanotubes

UT Dallas researchers are using nickel electrodes to explore making electrical contact with a carbon nanotube that is about one-100,000th the width of a human hair.
UT Dallas researchers are using nickel electrodes to explore making electrical contact with a carbon nanotube that is about one-100,000th the width of a human hair.

Abstract:
Results of New Project Could Transform Electronics Industry

Researchers Hope to Unlock Capabilities of Carbon Nanotubes

RICHARDSON, TX | Posted on July 2nd, 2007

In a three-year project that researchers say could revolutionize the electronics industry, engineers at The University of Texas at Dallas are attempting to establish a standard means for tapping the potential of carbon nanotubes.

Ever since they emerged in the early 1990s, nanotubes have promised to enable a whole new wave of technology, including ultra-fast computers that leave today's machines in their dust. But despite advances in manufacturing the tiny graphite cylinders, there's still no standard approach for making electrical contact with them.

"We think carbon nanotubes are ideal candidates to be the building blocks of electronic devices of the future, but to exploit their unique properties you have to be able to connect them to the outside world," said Dr. Moon Kim, a professor of electrical engineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at UT Dallas and the project's principal investigator. "This will be the first time anyone has determined the extensive metal contacts that need to be established with nanotubes in order to incorporate them into new technology."

Carbon nanotubes are particularly attractive because of their ability to carry electrical current without dissipating much heat, and heat loss is one of the semiconductor industry's chief enemies as silicon chips' physical features become ever smaller.

Nanotubes themselves bring new meaning to the word "small." Their walls can be just one atom thick, forcing researchers to find a way to make an electrical connection between our big clunky world and nanotubes' almost impossibly small one.

The $225,000 grant that's funding the research is one of eight awarded through the new Nano-Bio-Information Technology Symbiosis program, or NBIT, jointly operated by the South Korean Ministry of Science and Technology and the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research. The other U.S. universities receiving grants through the program are Harvard, Caltech, UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC San Diego, the University of Michigan and the University of Cincinnati.

"Not only is this research grant itself important, but it's part of a trend in which we've been successfully competing and collaborating with some of the most prestigious engineering schools in the country," said Dr. Bob Helms, dean of the Jonsson School. "And international collaborations like this are clearly going to be an increasingly important part of the way universities conduct research."

The eight grant winners emerged from a field of more than 50 research proposals submitted to NBIT. Each grant involves collaborative research between U.S. and Korean researchers. The UT Dallas researchers are collaborating with a team from South Korea's Sungkyunkwan University as well as a team from the University of Pittsburgh.

####

About UT Dallas
The University of Texas at Dallas, located at the convergence of Richardson, Plano and Dallas in the heart of the complex of major multinational technology corporations known as the Telecom Corridor, enrolls more than 14,500 students. The school’s freshman class traditionally stands at the forefront of Texas state universities in terms of average SAT scores. The university offers a broad assortment of bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree programs. For additional information about UT Dallas, please visit the university’s website at http://www.utdallas.edu .

About the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science

The Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science is one of the fastest-growing engineering schools in the United States. With nearly 3,000 students and more than 100 faculty, the school is in the midst of a $300 million initiative that includes the recent completion of a 192,000-square-foot interdisciplinary research building. Areas of research at the school include nanotechnology, human language technology, cybersecurity, telecommunications, bioengineering, and analog circuits and systems. For more information please visit http://www.ecs.utdallas.edu .

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Jenni Huffenberger
UT Dallas
(972) 883-4431


David Moore
UT Dallas
(972) 883-4183

Copyright © UT Dallas

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Chip Technology

Making quantum puddles: Physicists discover how to create the thinnest liquid films ever June 13th, 2018

Leti Presenting Strategic Vision and Hosting a Workshop at SEMICON West: “From Electrons to Photons” Leti Workshop and CEO Media Briefing Set for Tuesday, July 10 in W Hotel, San Francisco June 12th, 2018

Nanometrics Updates Time of Webcast at Stifel 2018 Cross Sector Insight Conference June 12th, 2018

Does nanoconfinement affect the interaction between two materials placed in contact? It ispossible to estimate how nanoconfinement affects the number of contacts formed by two materials placed in intimate contact and, hence, the interfacial interactions June 7th, 2018

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Nano-saturn: Supramolecular complex formation: Anthracene macrocycle and C60 fullerene June 8th, 2018

Unzipping graphene nanotubes into nanoribbons: New study shows elegant mathematical solution to understand how the flow of electrons changes when carbon nanotubes turn into zigzag nanoribbons June 6th, 2018

Making carbon nanotubes as usable as common plastics: Researchers discover that cresols disperse carbon nanotubes at unprecedentedly high concentrations May 15th, 2018

'Exceptional' research points way toward quantum discoveries: Rice University scientists make tunable light-matter couplings in nanotube films April 30th, 2018

Nanoelectronics

Leti Presenting Strategic Vision and Hosting a Workshop at SEMICON West: “From Electrons to Photons” Leti Workshop and CEO Media Briefing Set for Tuesday, July 10 in W Hotel, San Francisco June 12th, 2018

Quantum Interference May Be Key to Smaller Insulators: Breakthrough could jumpstart further miniaturization of transistors June 6th, 2018

Building nanomaterials for next-generation computing: Scientists recently developed a blueprint to fabricate new nanoheterostructures using 2D materials June 1st, 2018

Rare element to provide better material for high-speed electronics May 30th, 2018

Announcements

Camouflaged nanoparticles used to deliver killer protein to cancer June 17th, 2018

Squeezing light at the nanoscale: Ultra-confined light could detect harmful molecules June 17th, 2018

Physicists devise method to reveal how light affects materials: The new method adds to the understanding of the fundamental laws governing the interaction of electrons and light June 15th, 2018

Tripling the Energy Storage of Lithium-Ion Batteries: Scientists have synthesized a new cathode material from iron fluoride that surpasses the capacity limits of traditional lithium-ion batteries June 14th, 2018

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Squeezing light at the nanoscale: Ultra-confined light could detect harmful molecules June 17th, 2018

SUNY Poly Professor Eric Lifshin Selected for ‘Fellow of the Microanalysis Society’ Position for Significant Contributions to Microanalysis June 13th, 2018

New optical sensor can determine if molecules are left or right 'handed' June 13th, 2018

Evidence for a new property of quantum matter revealed: Electrical dipole activity detected in a quantum material unlike any other tested June 11th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project