Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > News > Can nuclear qubits point the way?

June 28th, 2007

Can nuclear qubits point the way?

Researchers from the London Centre for Nanotechnology and the US have published an article in Physical Review Letters (" Efficient Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at High Magnetic Fields") that describes a technique for making molecules a thousand times more useful for quantum computing.

Qubits might very well be the vehicle for the next revolution in computing. Silicon technology has made computers faster and faster, but now it seems that the limits of what is possible with ones and zeros are being reached. One of the answers could be the transition from the "good-old" bit to the flashy qubit.


Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Quantum Computing

Unusual quantum liquid on crystal surface could inspire future electronics October 22nd, 2016

Scientists find technique to improve carbon superlattices for quantum electronic devices: In a paradigm shift from conventional electronic devices, exploiting the quantum properties of superlattices holds the promise of developing new technologies October 20th, 2016

Exploring defects in nanoscale devices for possible quantum computing applications October 19th, 2016

A new spin on superconductivity: Harvard physicists pass spin information through a superconductor October 16th, 2016

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years: Targeted medicine deliveries and increased energy efficiency are just two of many ways October 26th, 2016

Imaging where cancer drugs go in the body could improve treatment October 26th, 2016

Precise quantum cloning: possible pathway to secure communication: Physicists create best ever quantum clones October 26th, 2016

The quantum sniffer dog: A laser and detector in 1: A microscopic sensor has been developed at TU Wien, which can be used to identify different gases simultaneously October 25th, 2016

The latest news from around the world, FREE

  Premium Products
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More

Nanotechnology Now Featured Books


The Hunger Project