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Home > News > Tiny fibers used to find explosives

June 6th, 2007

Tiny fibers used to find explosives

Abstract:
Nanofibers are about 1/250,000th of an inch across, but they could have a huge impact on such diverse areas as national security, factory safety and aerospace construction.

Dr. Ling Zang, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, recently received a $592,000, five-year CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation to continue his research with nanofibers.

Zang said the CAREER grant is a follow-up to a one-year grant for $100,000 he received last year.

Source:
semissourian.com

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