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Home > Press > ATI Researchers Win the

Abstract:
Members of the Nano-electronics Centre at the ATI have been awarded the "Runner-up" place in Obducat Prize 2006 for work related to nanolithography. The team, consisting of Mr Nanditha Dissanayake, Dr Damitha Adikaari, Dr Richard Curry, Dr Ross Hatton and Professor Ravi Silva, improved the fabrication of organic solar cells by modifying the device structure in the nano-scale using nano-imprinting lithography.

ATI Researchers Win the

UK | Posted on June 5th, 2007

Holy Grail for all thin film large area solar cell production has been the low power conversion efficiency of the devices at a reasonable cost. Organic solar cells offer low cost but also low power conversion efficiency. The team at Surrey have used nano-imprinting lithography, a technique that is simple to use, inexpensive and scalable, for fabricating organic solar cells with increased photon harvesting area, significantly increasing the power conversion efficiency. This technology can be extended to other scientific fields to fabricate nano-scale devices and systems not only for photovoltaic devices but nanoelectronics in general.

In their report of the proposal the Obducat Prize Award Selection Committee said "There is a high scientific level in the background work and it is judged as having a high generic quality and value which could generate a commercial potential in the future." Scientific quality and manufacturability were just two of the factors taken into account by the panel in evaluating proposals.

On news of their award, lead researcher Nanditha Dissanayake comments "It is very encouraging to receive recognition from a key player in the industrial community for our research efforts in using cutting edge nanotechnological tools to explore fabrication possibilities in high efficient, low cost solar cells as a viable energy source."

The Director of the ATI, Professor Ravi Silva said "We are justifiably proud of the relationship we have with industry on technologically significant issues and welcome this challenge of working closely with commercial partners on joint projects."

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About ATI-University of Surrey
The Advanced Technology Institute is an interdisciplinary research centre dedicated to advancing next-generation electronic and photonic device technologies. Our strategy is based on having selective and focussed programmes of research, each of critical mass, which embrace in their investigations the full spectrum of fundamental science through to applied engineering. We are proud of our record of excellence, and proud of the practical benefits our work has brought to the wider World.

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Contacts:
Advanced Technology Institute
School of Electronics & Physical Sciences
University of Surrey
Guildford GU2 7XH
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 1483 686100
Fax: +44 (0) 1483 689404

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