Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > News > Microbes survive in soil with fullerenes

March 14th, 2007

Microbes survive in soil with fullerenes

Abstract:
Natural settings may diminish the high toxicity of fullerenes or C60 nanoparticles to soil-dwelling microbes, according to new results published today on Environmental Science & Technology's Research ASAP website ("Impact of Fullerene (C60) on a Soil Microbial Community "). The findings contradict previous studies, which have shown that the nanoparticles are lethal in more unsoiled settings.
The new experiments, conducted under some of the most realistic conditions yet with microbes in soil, come from a team led by Ron Turco of Purdue University. The researchers exposed soil microbes to relatively high concentrations of C60 (1000 parts per million) both in dry form and in an aqueous suspension with tetrahydrofuran. They also exposed the microbes to tetrahydrofuran alone. This solvent is typically used in lab experiments to suspend C60 because the particles are not soluble in water at room temperature. The team incubated their C60 concoctions in real soil samples taken from corn plots northwest of the Purdue campus.

Source:
nanowerk.com

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Molybdenum disulfide holds promise for light absorption: Rice researchers probe light-capturing properties of atomically thin MoS2 May 5th, 2016

The intermediates in a chemical reaction photographed 'red-handed' Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have for the first time succeeded in imaging all the steps in a complex organic reaction and have resolved the mechanisms that explain it May 4th, 2016

New tool allows scientists to visualize 'nanoscale' processes May 4th, 2016

An Experiment Seeks to Make Quantum Physics Visible to the Naked Eye May 3rd, 2016

Environment

Team builds first quantum cascade laser on silicon: Eliminates the need for an external light source for mid-infrared silicon photonic devices or photonic circuits April 21st, 2016

Atomically thin sensor detects harmful air pollution in the home April 18th, 2016

Catalyst could make production of key chemical more eco-friendly April 10th, 2016

Nanoporous material's strange "breathing" behavior April 7th, 2016

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

Scientists propose non-animal tools for assessing the toxicity of nanomaterials: Particle and Fibre Toxicology publishes recommendations from expert group meeting April 26th, 2016

The impact of anti-odor clothing on the environment March 31st, 2016

SUNY Poly, in Collaboration with the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Stony Brook University, Demonstrates Pioneering Method to Visualize and Identify Engineered Nanoparticles in Tissue March 25th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic