Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Breast cancer treatment heats up

Abstract:
Attaching nanoscale bioprobes to cancer cells—and heating them—kills malignant cells, according to pre-clinical, developmental research in the march Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Breast cancer treatment heats up

Reston, VA | Posted on March 6th, 2007

In the March Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers demonstrate that miniscule bioprobes could be produced and used with molecularly targeted therapeutic heat to kill malignant breast cancer cells—without damaging nearby healthy tissue.

While many researchers have studied using heat in treating cancer, "the inability to deposit effective doses of heat in a tumor without applying similar heat to nearby normal tissue has prevented widespread clinical use," said Sally J. DeNardo, professor of internal medicine and radiology with the School of Medicine at the University of California Davis in Sacramento. "Our animal study, which combined the future-oriented sciences of nanotechnology and molecular imaging, shows that a method for delivering thermal ablation—removing or destroying cancer cells by using heat—is feasible," added the co-director of the university's radiodiagnosis and therapy section. "This exciting study—combining radiolabeled antibodies with nanoparticles or bioprobes—provides a new approach to direct thermal ablation specifically to tumor cells," she noted. DeNardo stressed that this heat treatment is in the preclinical, developmental stage, having been used only in lab mice; additional tests will need to be performed with cancer patients.

Such studies are important, explained DeNardo, indicating that breast cancer is the most common cancer among women (besides skin cancer). Statistics show that a woman has a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer during her life. This year, about 200,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 40,000 will die from the disease.

Scientists from UC Davis and Triton BioSystems in Boston, Mass., injected trillions of magnetic iron-containing bioprobes into the bloodstream of a lab mouse bearing a human cancer tumor. The magnetic iron nanoprobes—more than 10,000 of which can fit on the end of a straight pin—are concealed in polymers and sugars, making them nearly invisible to the body's immune system. Antibodies (joined with a radioactive substance) on these probes latched onto receptors that are on the surface of tumor cells. The heating of the probes can be activated and controlled by the use of a magnetic field from outside the body. By applying an alternating magnetic field to the tumor region, the magnetic spheres changed polarity thousands of times per second and created heat. This heat weakened—and destroyed—cancer cells. The bioprobes cooled off as soon as the alternating magnetic field was turned off and then passed out of the body. This process is described in detail in the JNM article, "Thermal Dosimetry Predictive for Efficacy of 111In-ChL6 Nanoparticle AMF-Induced Thermoablative Therapy for Human Breast Cancer in Mice."

"Using heat to kill cancer cells isn't a new concept. The biggest problems with using heat are how to apply it to the tumor cell alone, how to determine its effectiveness and how to predict the amount needed," said DeNardo. "By using heat—along with nanoparticles and a radiolabeled antibody—our quantitative imaging directed—and made safer—the application and development of therapy for cancer," she added. "This technique could join other cancer therapies, especially for cancers that are hard to treat now, such as breast cancer and metastatic melanoma," indicated DeNardo.

"Thermal Dosimetry Predictive for Efficacy of 111In-ChL6 Nanoparticle AMF-Induced Thermoablative Therapy for Human Breast Cancer in Mice" appears in the March issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, which is published by SNM, the leading international molecular imaging and nuclear medicine society. Co-authors include Gerald L. DeNardo, Arutselvan Natarajan, Laird A. Miers and Grete N. Adamson, all with the School of Medicine, UC Davis, Sacramento; Allan R. Foreman and Robert Ivkov, both with Triton BioSystems Inc., Chelmsford, Mass.; and Cordula Gruettner, Micromod Partikeltechnologie, GmbH, Rostock-Warnemuende, Germany.

Further information

To obtain a copy of this article, please contact Maryann Verrillo by phone at +1 (703) 652-6773 or send an e-mail to Current and past issues of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine can be found online at jnm.snmjournals.org. Print copies can be obtained by contacting the SNM Service Center, 1850 Samuel Morse Drive, Reston, VA 20190-5316; phone +1 (800) 513-6853; e-mail fax +1 (703) 708-9015. A subscription to the journal is an SNM member benefit.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Maryann Verrillo
+1 (703) 652-6773

Copyright © Journal of Nuclear Medicine

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Nanomedicine

Efficiency of Nanodrug Containing Antibiotics in Treatment of Infectious Diseases Evaluated August 31st, 2015

Researchers use DNA 'clews' to shuttle CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool into cells August 30th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use Artemisia Annua Plant to Produce Breast Cancer Drugs August 29th, 2015

Small but heading for the big time: Nanobiotix half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2015, in line with expectations: Major clinical achievements and corporate developments August 28th, 2015

Discoveries

Scientists 'squeeze' light one particle at a time: A team of scientists have measured a bizarre effect in quantum physics, in which individual particles of light are said to have been 'squeezed' -- an achievement which at least one textbook had written off as hopeless September 1st, 2015

Using ultrathin sheets to discover new class of wrapped shapes: UMass Amherst materials researchers describe a new regime of wrapped shapes August 31st, 2015

An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets August 31st, 2015

New material science research may advance tech tools August 31st, 2015

Announcements

Nanotech could rid cattle of ticks, with less collateral damage September 1st, 2015

Scientists 'squeeze' light one particle at a time: A team of scientists have measured a bizarre effect in quantum physics, in which individual particles of light are said to have been 'squeezed' -- an achievement which at least one textbook had written off as hopeless September 1st, 2015

An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets August 31st, 2015

New material science research may advance tech tools August 31st, 2015

Human Interest/Art

Bionic liver micro-organs explain off-target toxicity of acetaminophen (Tylenol): Israeli-German partnership aims to replace animal experiments with advanced liver-on-chip devices August 17th, 2015

Omni Nano and Time Warner Cable Partner to Provide Nanotechnology Education to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Los Angeles: A $10,000 Donation to Benefit Youth of Los Angeles County's Boys & Girls Clubs August 4th, 2015

Kalam: versatility personified August 1st, 2015

Pakistani Students Who Survived Terror Attack to Attend Weeklong “NanoDiscovery Institute” at SUNY Poly CNSE in Albany July 29th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic