Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > UI researcher cites need for a 'small view' of the environment

By thinking small, scientists can solve big environmental problems.

That is the message University of Iowa researcher Vicki H. Grassian delivered to colleagues Sunday, Feb. 18, at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco. She urged them to take a molecular view in order to understand problems, find solutions and move the country toward a sustainable society.

UI researcher cites need for a 'small view' of the environment

Iowa City, IA | Posted on February 18th, 2007

As one example, she cited Antarctic ozone thinning -- the "ozone hole" -- as an environmental problem that has already been well understood and alleviated.

"By taking a molecular perspective, scientists saw not only the role of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the problem, but also the role that ice particles play in the stratosphere by catalyzing reactions leading to ozone destruction," Grassian said. "This understanding has led to a ban on CFCs and a predicted stabilization of the ozone hole size and filling in of the hole over the next few decades."

She added that there needs to be more research focused on understanding molecular processes as they apply to a wide range of important environmental issues. "For example, there should be a design function of molecular assembly and disassembly and other strategies employed to safely degrade and recycle the materials contained in outdated computers so that they don't end up in landfills," she said.

Grassian said that her talk and other talks given during the AAAS session on sustainability were intended as a wake-up call to inspire scientific and technological innovations.

Her talk, titled "A Molecular Understanding of the Natural and Human-Impacted Environment: Laboratory Studies of Mineral Dust Aerosol Chemistry and Climate," was delivered during a AAAS session on the "Contributions from Chemical and Molecular Sciences in Achieving a Sustainable Future."

The AAAS session focused on the contributions that basic research in chemistry and related-scientific fields, including engineering and nanoscience, can make toward sustainability. Chemical innovations -- as they relate to sustainability -- have the potential to significantly impact many areas, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and air and water quality, she noted. The session featuring Grassian and National Science Foundation (NSF) Chemistry Division Director Luis Echegoyen focused on several issues including renewable energy and green chemistry, as well as the importance of international collaboration and education in achieving a sustainable future. The session summarized much of a report Grassian co-authored as part of a 2006 NSF workshop she co-chaired with Gerald Meyer of Johns Hopkins University.

Vicki H. Grassian is professor of chemistry in the University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, professor of chemical and biochemical engineering in the UI College of Engineering, and director of the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute at the University of Iowa She joined the UI faculty in 1990 and earned her doctorate in chemistry from the University of California-Berkeley in 1987. She was elected a 2005 AAAS Fellow in the chemistry section for her distinguished contributions to the fields of surface and atmospheric chemistry, most notably for laboratory studies to elucidate complex, heterogeneous reactions involving mineral dust aerosols. Grassian's work has included designing and implementing new laboratory experiments to better understand the link between the chemistry of mineral dust, or soil particles, in the atmosphere and other global processes, including climate and biogeochemical cycles as well as human health. Funding agencies supporting her research include NSF and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).


For more information, please click here

Gary Galluzzo


Copyright © University of Iowa News Services

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press


Unusual quantum liquid on crystal surface could inspire future electronics October 22nd, 2016

Nanosciences: Genes on the rack October 21st, 2016

Physicists use lasers to capture first snapshots of rapid chemical bonds breaking October 21st, 2016

Nanoparticle vaccinates mice against dengue fever October 21st, 2016


Inspiration from the ocean: An interdisciplinary team of researchers at UC Santa Barbara has developed a non-toxic, high-quality surface treatment for organic field-effect transistors October 18th, 2016

Silver nanoparticle concentration too low to be harmful in water supply, paper finds October 14th, 2016

Coffee-infused foam removes lead from contaminated water September 21st, 2016

Mathematical nanotoxicoproteomics: Quantitative characterization of effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes: This research article by Dr. Subhash Basak et al. will be published in Current Computer-Aided Drug Design, Volume 12, 2016 September 2nd, 2016

Human Interest/Art

Weizmann Institute of Science Presents: Weizmann Wonder Wander - 4G - is Online June 21st, 2016

Call for NanoArt and Art-Science-Technology Papers June 9th, 2016

Scientists propose non-animal tools for assessing the toxicity of nanomaterials: Particle and Fibre Toxicology publishes recommendations from expert group meeting April 26th, 2016

Are humans the new supercomputer?Today, people of all backgrounds can contribute to solving serious scientific problems by playing computer games. A Danish research group has extended the limits of quantum physics calculations and simultaneously blurred the boundaries between mac April 14th, 2016


Leti Scientists Participating in Sessions on Med Tech, Automotive Technologies, MEMS, Si-photonics and Lithography at SEMICON Europa: Teams also Will Demonstrate Technology Advances in Telecom, Data Fusion, Energy, Silicon Photonics and 3D Integration October 18th, 2016

The University of Applied Sciences in Upper Austria uses Deben tensile stages as an integral part of their computed tomography research and testing facility October 18th, 2016

Pokhara (Nepal) all set to host KaSAM-2016: An International Scientific Meeting on Advanced Materials October 15th, 2016

MEMS & Sensors Industry Group Reveals Tech Showcase Finalists --MSIG hosts competition for unique MEMS/sensors demos at MEMS & Sensors Executive Congress, 11/10/16 in Scottsdale, AZ October 11th, 2016

The latest news from around the world, FREE

  Premium Products
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More

Nanotechnology Now Featured Books


The Hunger Project