Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Unique Collaboration Funded to Develop Nanotechnology for Melanoma

Abstract:
A unique collaboration between electrical engineers, mechanical engineers and cancer researchers may be the perfect combination to improve diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with melanoma.

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1.1 million, four-year grant to researchers at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, the University of Colorado at Boulder and the University of Texas at Dallas to develop a mechanical system the size of a wristwatch that will display the presence or absence of genetic signals of melanoma.

Unique Collaboration Funded to Develop Nanotechnology for Melanoma

AURORA, CO | Posted on January 17th, 2007

Engineers, working with cancer researchers, will attempt to "wire" and color code various genes using nanotechnology to screen blood samples. The goal is to help physicians and patients visualize changes that occur in melanoma cells that indicate important developments such as disease progression or response to therapy.

The development of a panel of melanoma specific tumor markers through nanotechnology would significantly impact the way melanoma is diagnosed and treated, because the tumor markers could be detected before a tumor had grown large enough to be detected using current imaging technology. Approximately 20 percent of patients who develop malignant melanoma die of metastases present at diagnosis, but not detectable by any current imaging or biochemical techniques. Determination of who has, or will develop cancer, is an important step in the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment of cancer.

Nanomachines can be engineered to sense and pick up molecular markers of cancer cells, enabling scientists to detect molecular changes even when they occur only in a small percentage of cells. The nanoparticles are used to detect the presence of genetic changes and relay the information via electrical connections to doctors and researchers. The connections will produce different colors for different biomarkers.

"Imagine going to your doctor, and with a device the size of a wristwatch, being able to know within five minutes whether or not certain molecular signs of melanoma are present in a blood sample," said Lynne Bemis, PhD, associate professor at UCCC and a lead researcher on the grant. "By ‘seeing' at the very basic level if key biomarkers for melanoma are present and in what capacity, patients and their physicians will have valuable information about cell changes much earlier than current screening technologies do."

Bemis added that a nano device has the potential to not only show changes sooner than current technologies, such as PET (Positron Emission Tomography) Scanning, but would also be cost effective and more efficient. She emphasized that the device is years from its clinical debut, but this grant funding enables researchers to lay the groundwork that is critical to making the device a reality.

"From the engineer's point of view, nanotechnology is very exciting because it enables us to perform a variety of manipulations and operations directly at the size scale of the molecules linked to the disease. Better understanding the interaction of nanomaterials with various biomolecules will open doors to radically new ways to detect and intervene in disease processes," said Won Park, PhD, assistant professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder and the principal investigator of the grant.

Bemis and researchers in the William Robinson lab at the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colo., have already identified several biomarkers for Park to build into the panel and color code in collaboration with Jeong-Bong Lee, PhD, associate professor at the University of Texas at Dallas. The UCCC researchers will continue to look for novel biomarkers so that the engineers in Boulder and Dallas can develop a truly comprehensive panel that will provide the most complete information about each patient's tumor. More information on this project can be found at the project's website, http://onchip.colorado.edu .

####

About University of Colorado Cancer Center
The University of Colorado Cancer Center is the only National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in the Rocky Mountain Region. Headquartered primarily at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, its four-part mission is excellence in cancer research, treatment, prevention and education. For more information, visit the Web site at www.uccc.info or the UCDHSC Newsroom at http://www.uchsc.edu/news/inthenews/

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Contacts: Jenny Bertrand, UCCC,
(303) 724-3160,

Jim Scott, CU-Boulder, (303) 492-3114,

Copyright © UCHSC

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Nanomedicine

Detecting Cancer Earlier is Goal of Rutgers-Developed Medical Imaging Technology: Rare earth nanocrystals and infrared light can reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions October 21st, 2014

Design of micro and nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimers and Parkinsons: At the Faculty of Pharmacy of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country encapsulation techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs October 20th, 2014

Non-Toxic Nanocatalysts Open New Window for Significant Decrease in Reaction Process October 19th, 2014

European Commission opens the gate towards the implementation of Nanomedicine Translation Hub October 16th, 2014

Announcements

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

Detecting Cancer Earlier is Goal of Rutgers-Developed Medical Imaging Technology: Rare earth nanocrystals and infrared light can reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions October 21st, 2014

Human Interest/Art

Japanese gold leaf artists worked on a nano-scale: Study demonstrates X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a non-destructive way to date artwork July 3rd, 2014

Harry Potter-style invisibility cloaks: A real possibility next Christmas? Forget socks and shaving foam, the big kids of tomorrow want an invisible cloak for Christmas December 19th, 2013

Chicago Awareness Organization First Not-for-Profit to Sponsor Dog Training to Detect Ovarian Cancer Odorants December 12th, 2013

ZEISS Microscopes used to create images for Art Exhibit at Midway Airport: Art of Science: Images from the Institute for Genomic Biology October 25th, 2013

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

QD Vision Wins Prestigious Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency October 16th, 2014

Beyond LEDs: Brighter, new energy-saving flat panel lights based on carbon nanotubes - Planar light source using a phosphor screen with highly crystalline single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as field emitters demonstrates its potential for energy-efficient lighting device October 14th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE