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Home > News > Huge Fields of Self-Assembled Molecular Ridges May Help Sensors

November 30th, 2006

Huge Fields of Self-Assembled Molecular Ridges May Help Sensors

Abstract:
A droplet of liquid and a few seconds are all that researchers need to produce neatly spaced ridges of molecules that cover a huge area--at least by the standards of nanotechnology. In a feat of so-called self-assembly, a group reports that disk-shaped molecules can stack themselves by the millions into lines of up to a millimeter in length and covering several square millimeters.

Source:
sciam.com

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