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Home > News > Wireless Nanotech Sensors Could Monitor Power Systems 24/7

October 24th, 2006

Wireless Nanotech Sensors Could Monitor Power Systems 24/7

Engineers with UB's Energy Systems Institute, one of the nation's few academic research centers that studies the fundamentals of electric power, have for the past year been considering how nanoelectronics could dramatically shorten, or in some cases eliminate, crippling power outages.

"What we're proposing is to use wireless communications, by embedding tiny sensors at every point in the system," he said. "The nanosensors would then send in real-time a signal to a centralized computer using wireless communications. It would monitor the power coming to every home or business in the system at every instant in time."

University at Buffalo

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