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Home > News > Solitons Could Power Molecular Electronics

July 7th, 2006

Solitons Could Power Molecular Electronics

Abstract:
Scientists have discovered something new about exotic particles called solitons. Since the 1980s, scientists have known that solitons can carry an electrical charge when traveling through certain organic polymers. A new study now suggests that solitons have intricate internal structures. Scientists may one day use this information to put the particles to work in molecular electronics and artificial muscles, said Ju Li, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State University.

Source:
Ohio State University

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