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Home > News > Nanotubes emit infrared waves at defects

June 27th, 2006

Nanotubes emit infrared waves at defects

Abstract:
Researchers at IBM, US, and the University of Twente in The Netherlands have found that current-induced infrared emission from defects in carbon nanotubes could provide a way of analysing the nanotubes' structure. The phenomenon takes place when only one type of carrier (holes or electrons) is flowing in the nanotube, i.e. when it is in unipolar rather than ambipolar operation.

Source:
nanotechweb

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