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Home > Press > Polymeric micelles are compatible with high-throughput screening

Abstract:
HTS application of QBI Life Sciences’ PreserveX™ Polymeric Micelles could be major breakthrough in pharmaceutical research

Preliminary research shows Preservex™ polymeric micelles are compatible with high-throughput screening

Madison, WI | Posted on June 07, 2006

QBI Life Sciences, a leader in membrane protein research, announced today the results from initial screening of UGT1A1 that revealed the compatibility of PreserveX™ Polymeric Micelles with high-throughput screening assays. The announcement was made during a presentation by Olga Trubetskoy, a QBI Life Sciences Research Fellow, at the International Society for the Study of Xenobiotics (ISSX) European annual meeting in Manchester, England.

The study, conducted with a University of Wisconsin – Madison library of 352 compounds, showed that incorporation of UGT1A1 into PreserveX™ Polymeric Micelles stabilizes UGT, resulting in reduced background and an expanded assay dynamic range. Additionally, light scattering is minimized. Additional screenings are expected to take place later this year.

The data collected from high-throughput screening of UGTs provide a foundation for discovery of novel UGT substrates and inhibitors and for predicting drug metabolism, toxicity, drug-drug, and herbal-drug interactions during drug discovery and in clinical trials.

“The application of PreserveX™ Polymeric Micelles to high-throughput screening could prove to be a tremendous advance in pharmaceutical research,” said Ralph Kauten, CEO of QBI Life Sciences. “Our products have the potential to bring greater accuracy and efficiency to the screening process, which we believe will radically change the metrics of drug discovery.”

Until now membrane proteins have not been well understood because the extraction of membrane proteins from their natural environment can reduce stability and therefore activity, making screening for biological responses problematic.

QBI Life Sciences’ line of PreserveX™ Polymeric Micelles gives researchers the ability to isolate, stabilize, and preserve activity of the membrane proteins which can lead to better drug discovery techniques, more accurate results and more efficiency in the screening process. QBI Life Sciences has developed valuable drug discovery tools including these membrane protein stabilizing reagents, as well as surface coatings for membrane proteins and optimal media for cell-surface proteins.

QBI Life Sciences, a division of Quintessence Biosciences, Inc., is the first and only company offering polymeric micelle solutions to study membrane proteins.

The work resulting in this discovery is being funded under a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under the NIH’s Roadmap for Medical Research.

For more information about PreserveX™ Polymeric Micelles or to learn more about QBI Life Sciences, log on to www.qbilifesci.com.

####

Contact:
Ralph Kauten
(608) 441-2950
RalphK@qbilifesci.com

Copyright © QBI Life Sciences

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