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Home > Press > Study Shows Strong Job Growth

Study Shows Strong Job Growth in the Micro and Nanotechnology Sectors

Ann Arbor, MI | Posted on March 14, 2006

The nano job market is heating up, according to Small Times magazine, the leading source of news and analysis about the micro and nanotechnology sectors. Small Times conducted a compensation survey of micro and nano professionals that revealed an overall trend in higher compensation and expanding job opportunities. More than 1,300 micro and nano professionals throughout the United States and 36 other countries responded.

Key findings include:

  • On a global basis, the average salary in micro and nanotechnology is $84,605. In the United States, the average salary is $97,978.
  • Expect those numbers to rise: 64 percent of U.S. employees received a raise in 2005, and 75 percent said they expected to receive a raise in 2006.
  • Salaries are rising even faster in hot developing countries. For example, although the average micro and nano salary in India is only $15,850, a full 81 percent expect a raise of more than 5 percent in 2006.

According to David Forman, Small Times Associate Editor, the data show that employers are putting a premium on technology talent. "Engineers and researchers made, on average, almost $80,000 a year. But salaries varied significantly by employer type. Component integrators paid on average more than $94,000 per year while government labs paid considerably less: around $77,000."

Additional findings include:

  • Employees in micro and nano are highly educated. Globally, 36.7 percent reported a degree at the level of Ph.D., M.D., or J.D., while 29.1 percent reported a master’s level degree.
  • Those who earn the most in the micro and nanotechnology fields were partners in legal services firms in the United States.
  • Those earning the least were researchers in Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

The complete survey results can be found in this month’s issue of Small Times magazine or viewed online here. Images are available in hi-res format for use by media organizations reporting on the survey. All other use is strictly prohibited. Visit the press room here.


About Small Times:
Small Times magazine is a business publication covering the fast-emerging nanotechnology, MEMS, and microsystems markets. Founded in 2001, it is the leading source of news and analysis about micro and nanotechnology, detailing technological advances, applications, and investment opportunities to help business leaders stay informed and make critical decisions. Small Times is published by PennWell Corporation, a diversified global media and information company based in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and with offices worldwide.

For more information, please click here.

David Forman

Deborah S. Rodriguez

Copyright © Small Times

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