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Home > News > Nanodevices That Assemble Themselves

March 8th, 2006

Nanodevices That Assemble Themselves

Imagine unrolling an electronic newspaper that's automatically updated via the Internet. Or cheap roof shingles that double as solar panels. These are just two technologies that could become possible with the advent of plastic electronics made from tiny components that assemble themselves. UC Berkeley chemical engineer Rachel Segalman is conducting the fundamental research that could help make this nanoscale dream a reality. In December, Segalman's efforts earned her a National Science Foundation CAREER Award.

University of California, Berkeley

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