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Home > Press > nGimat Patents for Electronic and Optical Materials/Devices

nGimat announces patents covering fundamental compositions of matter and methods as well as new tunable capacitors for nGimat-designed components expected to be used in commercial and military wireless equipment

nGimat Patents for Electronic and Optical Materials/Devices

Atlanta, GA | Posted on February 13, 2006

nGimat Co. announced today the recent issuances of two U.S. patents (Nos. 6,975,500 and 6,986,955) as well as a foreign patent (GB2411661). These patents cover fundamental compositions of matter and methods as well as new tunable capacitors for nGimat-designed components expected to be used in commercial and military wireless equipment. Such components include tunable filters and phase shifters. These components are designed to allow future homeland security communications handsets to tune to multiple frequency bands as well as provide increased security of transmitted signals by beam direction. In addition, these components are anticipated to be substantially less expensive than what is currently being produced.

nGimat’s U.S. Patent No. 6,986,955, entitled “Electronic and Optical Materials,” is directed to thin films of barium strontium titanate deposited on a sapphire substrate, including C-plane sapphire. The crystalline structure of the thin films is epitaxial or near-epitaxial. Barium strontium titanate (“BST”) has properties that are particularly suitable for a variety of electronic and optical applications. Significantly, properties, such as refractive index and dielectric constant, of BST are tunable by application of a biasing electrical field. The very thin films of the invention have important promise for miniaturized electronic and electrooptical devices.

nGimat’s US Patent No. 6,975,500, entitled “Capacitor Having Improved Electrodes,” is directed to multi-layer tunable capacitors of specific configuration, including several layers. They are formed from dielectric material that has one or more discrete electrodes, each electrode being exposed to at least two thicknesses. These electrodes are surrounded by wider insulative material such that the material can be patterned into capacitors having specific values. The thin dielectric can be a tunable material so that the capacitance can be varied by adding thin electrodes that interact with direct current.

nGimat’s British Patent No. GB 2 411 611, entitled “Variable Capacitors, Composite Materials,” is directed to materials used in forming variable capacitors that can be tuned by a biasing voltage. The variable capacitors are formed from novel nanoparticles and composite materials. The invention is a method of producing nanoparticulates of elemental metal as well as a method of depositing at least a monolayer of metal nanoparticles on a substrate.


About nGimat:
nGimat Co. is a cost-effective manufacturer and innovator of engineered nanomaterials in the following areas: nanopowders, thin films and devices. nGimat's Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) and NanoSpraySM Processes along with its Nanomiser® Device enable synthesis of nanoparticles and thin films.

For more information, please click here.

Sandra Moreland

Copyright © nGimat

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