Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Proofreading and error-correction in nanomaterials inspired by nature

Abstract:
The new proofreading and error-removal process is based on catalytic DNA and represents a paradigm shift in nanoscale science and engineering

Proofreading and error-correction in nanomaterials inspired by nature

Champaign, IL | October 18, 2005

Mimicking nature, a procedure developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign can find and correct defects in self-assembled nanomaterials. The new proofreading and error-removal process is based on catalytic DNA and represents a paradigm shift in nanoscale science and engineering.

Despite much progress made in the self-assembly of nanomaterials, defects that occur during the assembly process still present major obstacles for applications such as molecular electronics and photonics. Efforts to overcome this problem have focused on optimizing the assembly process to minimize errors, and designing devices that can tolerate errors.

"Instead of trying to avoid defects or work around them, it makes more sense to accept defects as part of the process and then correct them during and after the assembly process," said Yi Lu, a chemistry professor at Illinois and a researcher at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. "This procedure is analogous to how nature deals with defects, and can be applied to the assembly of nanomaterials using biomolecules or biomimetic compounds."

In protein synthesis, nature ensures accuracy by utilizing a proofreading unit that detects and corrects errors in translation, often through hydrolysis of incorrect amino acid building blocks. In a similar fashion, Lu and graduate students Juewen Liu and Daryl Wernette utilized catalytic DNA to locate and remove errors in a DNA-templated gold nanoparticle assembly process. The researchers describe the procedure in a paper accepted for publication in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, and posted on its Web site.

Catalytic DNA contains a substrate strand and an enzyme strand. In the presence of certain ions, the substrate is cleaved by the enzyme into two pieces of unequal length. The cleaved fragment with the shorter binding arm can be easily released. This catalytic DNA serves as a template for assembly of nanoparticles.

There are three kinds of nanoparticles encoded by different DNA in the system: two are defined as "correct" particles and one is defined as a "wrong" particle. Besides the difference in coding DNA, the nanoparticles can also be different in other aspects, such as size.

"To allow the catalytic DNA substrate to be a template for nanoparticle assembly, the substrate strand must be complementary to the DNA attached to the nanoparticles," Lu said. "A defect can occur in a DNA-templated gold nanoparticle assembly when the wrong particle is incorporated into the structure."

When a particle of the correct size is encountered, binding of the longer arm of the enzyme to the DNA template is permitted, while binding of the shorter arm to the DNA template is inhibited. "The active structure of the catalytic DNA cannot form," Lu said. "As a result, the template is not cleaved and the particle is incorporated into the assembly."

When a particle of the wrong size is mistakenly incorporated into the assembly, the enzyme can bind both its arms to the substrate template and form an active structure to cleave the substrate and remove the particle.

By showing that defects - the wrong size particles, in this case - can be identified and removed, the researchers demonstrated that proofreading and error-correction can take place during and after the assembly of nanoparticles.

"This was a small, but definite, step in the right direction," Lu said. "The error-correction procedure can be expanded to include many other biomolecules and biomimetic compounds for controlling the assembly of nanoparticles of defined particle sizes, shapes or compositions; as well as other nanomaterials, such as nanotubes and nanowires."

The researchers have applied for a patent. The work was funded by the U.S. Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation.

Editor's note: To reach Yi Lu, call 217-333-2619; yi-lu@uiuc.edu.

####


Contact:
James E. Kloeppel
Physical Sciences Editor
217-244-1073
kloeppel@uiuc.edu

Copyright © University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Possible Futures

Air Force’s 30-year plan seeks 'strategic agility' August 1st, 2014

IBM Announces $3 Billion Research Initiative to Tackle Chip Grand Challenges for Cloud and Big Data Systems: Scientists and engineers to push limits of silicon technology to 7 nanometers and below and create post-silicon future July 10th, 2014

Virus structure inspires novel understanding of onion-like carbon nanoparticles April 10th, 2014

Local girl does good March 22nd, 2014

Self Assembly

Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers: Rice University researchers' acid-free approach leads to strong conductive carbon threads September 15th, 2014

Molecular self-assembly controls graphene-edge configuration September 10th, 2014

Rice chemist wins rare NSF Special Creativity Award: Grant extension will bolster Zubarev's effort to produce gold nanorods September 8th, 2014

Magnetic nanocubes self-assemble into helical superstructures September 4th, 2014

Materials/Metamaterials

Next-Gen Luxury RV From Global Caravan Technologies Will Offer MagicView Roof and Windshield Using SPD-SmartGlass Technology From Research Frontiers: Recreational Vehicle Manufacturer Global Caravan Technologies (GCT) Features 28 Square Feet of MagicView™ SPD-SmartGlass September 17th, 2014

Nanoribbon film keeps glass ice-free: Rice University lab refines deicing film that allows radio frequencies to pass September 16th, 2014

‘Small’ transformation yields big changes September 16th, 2014

Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers: Rice University researchers' acid-free approach leads to strong conductive carbon threads September 15th, 2014

Announcements

New NPZ100-403 Piezo Stage from nPoint Inc. September 17th, 2014

Scientists refine formula for nanotube types: Rice University theorists determine factors that give tubes their chiral angles September 17th, 2014

New non-invasive technique could revolutionize the imaging of metastatic cancer September 17th, 2014

Toward making lithium-sulfur batteries a commercial reality for a bigger energy punch September 17th, 2014

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

‘Small’ transformation yields big changes September 16th, 2014

Berkeley Lab Licenses Boron Nitride Nanotube Technology: New material has unique mechanical and electronic properties September 13th, 2014

Secure Computing for the ‘Everyman': Quantum computing goes to market in tech transfer agreement with Allied Minds September 2nd, 2014

New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits August 29th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE