Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Fastest Method for Transmitting Information in Cell Phones and Computers

Abstract:
Demonstrating breakneck signal speed of 10 Ghz, method uses nanotubes rather than conventional copper wires

UCI Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Create World's Fastest Method for Transmitting Information in Cell Phones and Computers

Irvine, CA | June 09, 2005

UC Irvine scientists in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering have demonstrated for the first time that carbon nanotubes can route electrical signals on a chip faster than traditional copper or aluminum wires, at speeds of up to 10 GHz. The breakthrough could lead to faster and more efficient computers and improved wireless network and cellular phone systems, adding to the growing enthusiasm about nanotechnology's revolutionary potential.

“Our prior research showed that nanotube transistors can operate at extremely high frequencies, but the connections between the transistors were made out of somewhat slower copper, thus forming a bottleneck for the electrical signals,” said Peter Burke, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and one of the researchers who developed the technology. “In this technology we show that nanotubes can also quickly route electronic signals from one transistor to another, thus removing the bottleneck.”

Electrical signals are routed at high speed through virtually all modern electronic systems and also through the airwaves in all modern wireless systems.

“From now on, any time a nanotube device is used anywhere in the world in a high-speed electronic device, computer, wireless network or telephone system, people will benefit from this technology,” Burke added.

A nanotube is commonly made from carbon and consists of a graphite sheet seamlessly wrapped into a cylinder only a few nanometers wide. A nanometer is one billionth of a meter, about the size of 10 atoms strung together.

Most of the layers of a modern semiconductor chip are dedicated to interconnect wiring, making the material used, and its speed, extremely important. The semiconductor industry recently shifted from using aluminum to copper as interconnects because copper carries electrical signals faster than aluminum. Based on Burke’s work, it is now clear that changing the industry from copper to nanotubes would provide an even larger performance advantage in terms of speed. Before such a shift could occur, however, nanotube technology would need to be economical to manufacture and require precise assembly, a project Burke is currently working on.

Previous work by the Burke team demonstrated that nanotubes can carry electrical signals up to several mm across a chip better than copper, but did not measure how fast the signals propagate. This work is the first interconnect technology demonstration for ultra-high speed applications. Now that Burke’s team has developed both high-speed nanotube interconnect technology and high-speed nanotube transistor technology, they hope to integrate the two into an ultra-high speed all-nanotube electronic circuit, faster than any existing semiconductor technology.

Burke conducted the research along with graduate student Zhen (Jenny) Yu. The findings have been reported in the June, 2005 issue of Nano Letters, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

The Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the National Science Foundation provided funding for the research, which took place at UCI's Integrated Nanosystems Research Facility in The Henry Samueli School of Engineering.

####

About the Henry Samueli School of Engineering:
The Henry Samueli School of Engineering is one of the nation's fastest growing engineering schools, attracting talented engineering faculty and students from across the nation and abroad. The School consists of five departments: biomedical engineering, chemical engineering and materials science, civil and environmental engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, and mechanical and aerospace engineering. The school is home to numerous research centers, including the Integrated Nanosystems Research Facility, the National Fuel Cell Research Center, the Center for Embedded Computer System, and the Center for Pervasive Communications and Computing. Additionally, it is a major participant in the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, Calit2. Further, more than a third of the School’s 95 faculty members are fellows in professional societies and seven have been elected into the National Academy of Engineering.

For more information, please visit www.eng.uci.edu

About the University of California, Irvine:
Celebrating 40 years of innovation, the University of California, Irvine is a top-ranked public university dedicated to research, scholarship and community service. Founded in 1965, UCI is among the fastest-growing University of California campuses, with more than 24,000 undergraduate and graduate students and about 1,400 faculty members. The second-largest employer in dynamic Orange County, UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $3 billion.

For more UCI news, please visit www.today.uci.edu

Contact:
Lisa Briggs
(949) 824-3088
lbriggs@uci.edu

Copyright © University of California, Irvine

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Possible Futures

Sediment dwelling creatures at risk from nanoparticles in common household products August 13th, 2015

Harris & Harris Group Reports Financial Statements as of June 30, 2015, and Announces a Stock Repurchase Program August 10th, 2015

Molecular trick alters rules of attraction for non-magnetic metals August 5th, 2015

Global Carbon Nanotubes Industry 2015: Acute Market Reports August 4th, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Developing Component Scale Composites Using Nanocarbons August 26th, 2015

Southampton scientists find new way to detect ortho-para conversion in water August 25th, 2015

Revolutionary MIT-Developed Nanotechnology Company Showcases at CAMX in Dallas August 20th, 2015

Engineering a better 'Do: Purdue researchers are learning how August 4th, 2015

Nanoelectronics

Nanotechnology that will impact the Security & Defense sectors to be discussed at NanoSD2015 conference August 25th, 2015

'Quantum dot' technology may help light the future August 19th, 2015

Surprising discoveries about 2-D molybdenum disulfide: Berkeley Lab researchers use award-winning campanile probe on promising semiconductor August 15th, 2015

Better together: Graphene-nanotube hybrid switches August 3rd, 2015

Announcements

Small but heading for the big time: Nanobiotix half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2015, in line with expectations: Major clinical achievements and corporate developments August 28th, 2015

A new technique to make drugs more soluble August 28th, 2015

Nanocatalysts improve processes for the petrochemical industry August 28th, 2015

Nanolab Technologies LEAPS Forward with High-Performance Analysis Services to the World: Nanolab Orders Advanced Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) Microscope from CAMECA Unit of AMETEK Materials Analysis Division August 27th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic