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Home > News > Nano pyramids boost fuel cells

May 4th, 2005

Nano pyramids boost fuel cells

Abstract:
Researchers from Rutgers University have devised a way to make iridium surfaces that are extremely finely textured. The surface is textured with pyramids that range from 5 to 14 nanometers, or millionths of a millimeter, on a side, which increases the available surface area of the metal. The increased surface area speeds the catalytic reaction that breaks down ammonia to extract hydrogen.

Source:
TRN

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