Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


Home > Press > Unique Plasma Process for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

A Green Technology in Response to the Kyoto Protocol

World's Unique Plasma Process for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Production

Montreal, Quebec, Canada | March 30, 2005

Raymor Industries Inc. (TSX-V: RAR) is proud to announce the signing of an agreement with the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), whereby Raymor has acquired the exclusive worldwide rights for the commercialization of a new technology for the production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWNT), based on a plasma process, unique in the world. This process is 25 times more efficient, less dangerous, and less costly than any other existing technologies in the world. Environmentally, this process is non-polluting (green technology) and helps Canada meets its commitments with respect to the Kyoto Protocol. BCC Research estimates that global sales of carbon nanotubes will reach US$231.5 million in 2006, with an average annual growth rate of 173% over the next 5 years.

Raymor plans to increase its current C-SWNT production capacity by using larger power plasma torches already installed at its plant. The minimum revenue forecasted for the next 12 months is CDN$1.0 million, with CDN$5.0 million in 24 months, and CDN$10 million in 36 months. As well, revenues may dramatically increase with increased available capacity from the production units actually in place. The capacity installed in the plant will allow for a production rate in the order of 10,000 grams/day in the next 12 months. Also, Raymor will use a large portion of its production to develop future applications with targeted strategic partners.

Presently, the market price of C-SWNT fluctuates around US$500/gram. This elevated price is primarily due to the very high production costs of the processes used by the competition for the production of similar quality C-SWNT. Given the very high efficiency of the Raymor process, the company anticipates offering its C-SWNT at more reasonable prices, while grabbing a large portion of the global market. The lower price and higher availability will facilitate the rapid integration of C-SWNT in a large number of future applications.

Raymor’s unique process uses a plasma torch to produce large quantities of high quality C-SWNT based on methane gas as the raw material. These nanotubes (C-SWNT) are 100 times stronger than steel at 1/6th the weight, are able to withstand high temperatures, and are extremely conductive. CSWNT can be used for countless technology innovations, such as chemical sensors, structural reinforcement, electrical sensors, fuel cells, portable X-ray machines, extremely lightweight and strong fabrics, artificial muscles and lightweight components of cars and spacecraft, as well as a multitude of other applications.

This revolutionary process is highly sustainable because it uses methane, a greenhouse gas abundantly available worldwide, and it produces C-SWNT and hydrogen. Hydrogen is a secure emission-free fuel for heat and electricity production or even next-generation vehicles. It is important to note that the destruction of methane enables Raymor to support Canada’s efforts in meeting its commitment to the Kyoto Protocol.

In comparison with the Raymor process, the three other known processes used by competitors for single-walled nanotube production (C-SWNT) have a low production efficiency, a high operating cost, and/or use a dangerous combination of high pressure, high temperature and toxic carbon monoxide (CO).

“There is no question that single-walled carbon nanotubes will have enormous impact on our lives. This new process makes it easier and safer to produce the high quality nanotubes needed for breakthrough technologies,” said Stéphane Robert, President of Raymor Industries Inc. “Manufacturers around the world are looking for sustainable and efficient ways to incorporate nanotechnology into their products. We’ve brought them one step closer with this Raymor process,” adds Mr. Robert.

Scientific breakthrough has been developed at the INRS-EMT (Montreal)

The development of Raymor’s process started in 1999. A proof of concept of the process was conducted in 2000. From that point, it took five years to optimize the process, and ready it for largescale production.

“We’ve waited a long time to see our innovation enter real-world production and, thanks to Raymor, we are happy that manufacturers around the world will benefit from the extraordinary properties of singlewalled carbon nanotubes, produced using an efficient and environmentally-friendly process,” said Dr. Barry Stansfield from INRS.


About Raymor Industries Inc.
Raymor Industries (TSX-V:RAR) has for mission to be the largest Canadian developer of high technology and a producer/recycler of advanced materials and nanomaterials for high value-added applications. In November 2004, Raymor Industries created a wholly-owned, industrial subsidiary, AP&C Advanced Powders and Coatings, specializing in nanotechnology and advanced materials, and comprising four operational divisions: (1) nanotechnology products, including nano-powders, nano-coatings, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWNT) for “the applications of tomorrow”; (2) metal and ceramic coatings, which largely targets aerospace, military, and mining applications; (3) spherical metallic powders, primarily used for biomedical and aerospace applications; and (4) net-shape forming, a component manufacturing technique used for ballistic protection and other aerospace and military applications. Raymor holds the exclusive rights to more than 21 patents throughout the world, with other patents pending.

Visit for more information.

Raymond Fournel
Investor Relations
Tel: 514-932-3485
Fax: 514-932-3644

Copyright © Raymor Industries

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique

Related News Press

Possible Futures

Crystal clear: Thousand-fold fluorescence enhancement in an all-polymer thin film: Griffith University researchers report breakthrough due to novel and multi-layer Colloidal Photonic Crystal structure October 2nd, 2015

Scientists produce status check on quantum teleportation October 1st, 2015

Hopes of improved brain implants October 1st, 2015

Graphene Has a Place on the Hype Cycle, Says European Flagship Director October 1st, 2015


Rice news release: Smaller is better for nanotube analysis: Rice University's variance spectroscopy technique advances nanoparticle analysis September 30th, 2015

Carbon Nanotubes Applied to Create Electrical Conductivity in Woolen Fabrics September 30th, 2015

Characterizing the forces that hold everything together: UMass Amherst physicists offer new open source calculations for molecular interactions September 23rd, 2015

UO research dollars climbed in FY 2015: Buoyed by an uptick in federal awards, the university saw gains in its overall sponsored research funding and continued high proposal counts in 2014-2015 September 17th, 2015


Horizontal magnetic tunneling in a field-effect device integrated on Silicon October 2nd, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Announces New Office in Arizona to Service the Company's New Regional and National Home Builders in Arizona and Nevada October 2nd, 2015

Production of High Temperature Ceramics with Modified Properties in Iran October 2nd, 2015

ISO Approves 2 Int'l Nanotechnology-Related Standards Proposed by Iran October 2nd, 2015

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Graphene Has a Place on the Hype Cycle, Says European Flagship Director October 1st, 2015

Wearable electronic health patches may now be cheaper and easier to make September 30th, 2015

An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets August 31st, 2015

Developing Component Scale Composites Using Nanocarbons August 26th, 2015


Tiny carbon-capturing motors may help tackle rising carbon dioxide levels September 24th, 2015

Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater by Electromagnetic Superabsorbent Nanocomposites September 17th, 2015

Nanotech expertise earns Virginia Tech a spot in National Science Foundation network: New center's focus will be on earth, environmental nanotechnology September 16th, 2015

Porous Nanosorbent Increase Efficiency of Engine Oil Recycling September 16th, 2015

The latest news from around the world, FREE

  Premium Products
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More

Nanotechnology Now Featured Books


The Hunger Project

Car Brands
Buy website traffic