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Home > News > Single electron transistor created with tiny mechanical arm

September 26th, 2004

Single electron transistor created with tiny mechanical arm

The infinitesimal size and low power requirements of a single electron transistor (SET), created by Electrical and Computer Engineering Associate Professor Robert Blick and physicist Dominik Scheible of Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, could eventually lead to advances such as much tinier semiconductor chips; more powerful yet less power-hungry cell phones; and long-lived remote sensors for monitoring everything from airborne toxins to forest fires. And unlike earlier SETs, the device is fabricated in silicon by a simple, two-step process and operates at room rather than super-low temperatures, allowing its easy integration into existing, silicon-based circuits, says Blick.


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