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Home > News > Nanotube films have high potential for consumer, military applications

September 1st, 2004

Nanotube films have high potential for consumer, military applications

Abstract:
A team of University of Florida researchers has made transparent and electrically conductive carbon nanotube films using a process highly suitable for industrial production, an advance that suggests new, large-scale applications for the extremely tiny cylinders, and possibly new products such as bendable video screens. The ultra-thin films, made thus far with areas as large as 12 square inches, appear to be competitive with the electrically conducting layers pervasively used in video displays, solar cells, optical communication equipment and other common electronics. More

Source:
UF News

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