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August 12th, 2004

Patching together nanomaterials

Self-assembly of nanoparticles is one of the most attractive ways to build nanostructures. But the big challenge is to program the particles to assemble the way you want them to. Researchers at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor have explored a rather general way to direct such an assembly process into a wide range of structures, including chains, sheets, rings and three-dimensional clusters with various symmetries.

* Nature

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