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Home > News > Self-assembling 'Nanotubes' Offer Promise For Future Artificial Joints

April 9th, 2004

Self-assembling 'Nanotubes' Offer Promise For Future Artificial Joints

Abstract:
Researchers at Purdue University, the University of Alberta and Canada's National Institute for Nanotechnology have discovered that bone cells called osteoblasts attach better to nanotube-coated titanium than they do to conventional titanium used to make artificial joints. "We have demonstrated the same improved bone-cell adhesion with other materials, but these nanotubes are especially promising for biomedical applications because we'll probably be able to tailor them for specific parts of the body," said Thomas Webster, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue.

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