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Home > News > Nano Ribbons Coil into Rings

April 9th, 2004

Nano Ribbons Coil into Rings

Abstract:
Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have found a way to coax microscopic zinc oxide ribbons to spontaneously coil, slinky-like, into perfect rings. The rings are single-crystal material and are 300 nanometers wide, 10 nanometers thick and three microns wide. The rings are a little more than half the girth of a red blood cell. The tiny rings are potentially useful as parts, including sensors, resonators, transducers and actuators, in nanoscale machines.

Source:
TRN

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