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Home > News > Titania nanotube sensors clean themselves

April 2nd, 2004

Titania nanotube sensors clean themselves

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University, US, have developed titania nanotube hydrogen sensors that are self-cleaning. The sensors removed coatings of motor oil and stearic acid on exposure to ultraviolet light by a process of photocatalytic oxidation. Titania nanotubes have photocatalytic properties around 100 times greater than any other form of titania. “Their photocatalytic properties are so large that the material can effectively degrade any contaminate (so long as it does not contain salt, which destroys the photocatalytic properties),” Craig Grimes told (more on earlier article)


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